Table of Contents
  1. Intro
  2. Design
    1. Stand
    2. Borders
    3. Thickness
  3. Picture Quality
    1. Contrast
    2. Local Dimming
    3. SDR Peak Brightness
    4. Gray Uniformity
    5. Viewing Angle
    6. Black Uniformity
    7. Gradient
    8. Pre Calibration
    9. Post Calibration
    10. 480p Input
    11. 720p Input
    12. 1080p Input
    13. 4k Input
    14. Color Gamut
    15. Reflections
    16. 3D
    17. Pixels
  4. Motion
    1. Motion Blur
    2. Image Flicker
    3. 24p Playback
    4. Motion Interpolation
  5. Inputs
    1. Input Lag
    2. Supported Resolutions
    3. Side Inputs
    4. Rear Inputs
    5. Total Inputs
    6. Inputs Specifications
  6. Sound Quality
    1. Frequency Response
    2. Total Harmonic Distortion
  7. Smart Features
    1. Ads
    2. Remote
    3. Misc
  8. Conclusion
  9. Q&A
Reviewed on Jun 29, 2015

Samsung JS9500
TV REVIEW

Usage Ratings
7.9Mixed Usage
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What it is General purpose. The TV will be used for a variety of content and usages. Movies at night, TV shows during the day, video games from time to time, etc.
Score components:
8.5Movies
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What it is Movies in the dark. The TV will be used for watching movies in a controlled environment, directly in front, in a home theater way. Mostly only high quality content, like Blu-rays, UHD Blu-rays, streaming and a little bit of HDR.
Score components:
7.7TV Shows
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What it is TV Shows in a bright living room. The TV will be used in to watch TV shows, in a bright room during the day, from multiple viewing positions at different angles. The content watched has an average quality: cable, streaming, SD channels, etc.
Score components:
7.5Sports
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What it is Sports in a living room. The TV will be used to watch sports during the day, like football or hockey. Usually watched with a group, so from multiple viewing position.
Score components:
8.0Video Games
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What it is Video games. The TV will be used to play video games, directly in front, in a controlled light environment. Usually fast games, like online FPS, where motion blur and input lag is important.
Score components:
8.2HDR Movies
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What it is HDR Movies and TV shows. The TV will be used to watch 4k UHD HDR content, with a wide color gamut and a high peak brightness. Either via UHD Blu-rays or HDR streaming.
Score components:
8.2HDR Gaming
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What it is HDR Gaming. The TV will be used to play HDR video games using consoles that support it or on current generation gaming PCs. Xbox One S, PS4 Pro, GTX 10 series and AMD RX series graphics cards.
6.9PC Monitor
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What it is PC Monitor. The TV will be used as a PC monitor, from 2-3 feet away, either for productivity purposes or gaming. Sharp text is important, as well as a high resolution.
Score components:
Type : LED
Resolution : 4k
Refresh Rate : 120 Hz

The Samsung JS9500 SUHD TV is a great 4k LED TV. The picture quality and its backlight are impressive, but it isn't without flaws. It has poor gray uniformity and a limited viewing angle.

Test Results
Design 9.0
Picture Quality 8.1
Motion 8.0
Inputs 7.6
Sound Quality 6.8
Smart Features 8.5
Pros
  • Wider color gamut
  • Low motion blur and input lag
  • Bright and doesn't reflect a lot of light
Cons
  • Poor gray uniformity
  • Limited viewing angle

Check Price

65" UN65JS9500 SEE PRICE
78" UN78JS9500 SEE PRICE
88" UN88JS9500 SEE PRICE
9.0

Design

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Score components: Subjectively assigned
Samsung JS9500 Design Picture
Curved : Yes

The Samsung JS9500 looks and feels like a high-end TV. It is quite heavy and thick, due to its full array local dimming backlight. The stand, too, is quite stable, given the weight of the TV.

Stand
Samsung JS9500 Stand Picture

Dimensions of 65" TV stand: 41.75" by 15".

Borders
Samsung JS9500 Borders Picture
Borders : 0.59" (1.5 cm)

Thickness
Samsung JS9500 Thickness Picture
Max Thickness : 3.54" (9 cm)

8.1

Picture Quality

This is an okay TV for movies. Its blacks are pretty average, and the same can be said for the uniformity of dark scenes. If you're looking for an exceptional cinematic experience, this isn't the best TV.

It has a few nice extras, though. It has HDR, and is bright objects are able to get brighter than on any other TV we've seen when this feature is enabled. It also comes with really good local dimming, and very good 3D capabilities.

7.9 Contrast
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What it is: Brightness difference between white and black. This is the main component of picture quality.
When it matters: Always, but especially when watching dark scenes.
Score components:
Native Contrast
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What it is: Ratio of the white brightness divided by the blacks measured on our checkerboard test pattern with a white target of 100 cd/m².
When it matters: Dark scenes in a dark room.
Good value: > 3,000
Noticeable difference: 500
:
3106 : 1

Turning on the local dimming didn't change our contrast ratio measurement at all (we measure it on a checkboard pattern). The native contrast on this TV is only average.

8.0 Local Dimming
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What it is: The lights behind the LCD layer adapt to the picture displayed, improving the contrast ratio.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Local Dimming
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What it is: Whether it has a feature that controls the LEDs behind the LCD layer, to match the picture and darkens the dark portion of it.
When it matters: On LED TVs only. Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
:
Yes
Backlight
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What it is: Configuration of the lights of the backlight.
When it matters: Effectiveness of the local dimming.
Good value: Full-array/direct lighting is better for local dimming. As for the uniformity of the screen, it depends on the implementation. Some edge-lit TVs have more uniform blacks than some full-array TVs.
:
Full-Array

The local dimming is quite responsive, but there is some noticeable blooming around bright objects.

More videos in the Q&A section of the review.

7.5 SDR Peak Brightness
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What it is: How bright the screen can get. Measured with local dimming and with SDR content.
When it matters: Bright living rooms; bright objects; SDR content.
SDR Peak 2% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright highlights, present on screen for a short time; especially for SDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
727 cd/m2
SDR Peak 50% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
381 cd/m2

Given the same HDR footage, the difference between how well two TVs display HDR content is based on how wide of a dynamic contrast range they can display. To test this, we display a 2% white window and put the backlight and local dimming to the max. We then measure how bright that rectangle is.

We measured 726.7 cd/m2 on the Samsung UN65JS9500, which is quite bright. You can see a big blooming area around it though, but at least the edges of the screen are completely turned off.

Of course, this test is far from perfect. When the HDR format gets standardized in a few months, we will update the review with a more meaningful test.

6.8 Gray Uniformity
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What it is: Evenness of colors onscreen (not just gray).
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Score components:
Samsung JS9500 50% Uniformity Picture
50% Std. Dev.
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What it is: Average squared difference of pixels when displaying a mid 50% gray.
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Good value: < 2.5%
Noticeable difference: 1%
:
3.817 %
50% DSE
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What it is: High-frequency variance of uniformity. Dark spots on the screen.
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Good value: < 0.165%
Noticeable difference: 0.025%
:
0.201 %

Unfortunately, the gray uniformity isn't very good. You can see a few darker spots and edges. Curved TVs tend to have worse uniformity than their flat equivalent.

4.2 Viewing Angle
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What it is: Color accuracy when viewed from the side.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Score components:
LCD Type
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What it is: Type of LCD technology used by the TV.
When it matters: Different technologies have different viewing angle properties.
Good value: IPS maintains good color accuracy at an angle, but has a poor contrast ratio from in front. VA has great picture quality in front, but loses saturation at an angle.
:
VA
Color Shift
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What it is: Angle where the colors noticeable shift compared to when viewed from directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
20 °
Brightness
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What it is: Angle where the brightness drops to 50% of the brightness directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
30 °
Black Level
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What it is: Angle where the black level drops to 50% of the black level directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
17 °

Like all VA panels, the colors are not the same when you sit at an angle. You will need to watch in front to appreciate this TV's picture quality.

Update 01/06/2017: We have changed the methodology of testing. Since this is an old TV which we don't have anymore, we extrapolated the results from 2016 TVs.

8.5 Black Uniformity
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What it is: Evenness of blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Score components:
Samsung JS9500 Native Black Uniformity Picture
Native Std. Dev.
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What it is: Average of the squared difference of the blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Good value: < 2%
Noticeable difference: 1%, but keep in mind that it varies a lot by unit, even of the same model; yours likely will not end up exactly like ours.
:
1.216 %

The black uniformity is average. Turning on the local dimming feature helps a little bit to hide this issue, but you can still see some clouding in some dark scenes.

9.0 Gradient
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What it is: How finely levels of color can be displayed.
When it matters: Details in shadows, sky and skin tones. Matters more for HDR content.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Color Depth
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What it is: Number of bits per pixel to represent a specific color. Note: we consider 8-bit with dithering to be equivalent to 10-bit, as long as the 10-bit gradient looks smooth.
When it matters: HDR content like UHD Blu-ray players. Won't matter for cable TV, regular Blu-ray movies, video game consoles or content displayed from a Windows PC. Those are limited to 8-bit color.
Good value: 10-bit.
Noticeable difference: 1 bit.
:
10 Bit

8.9 Pre Calibration
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What it is: TV's color accuracy before a full calibration. Only the picture mode and backlight level were changed.
When it matters: All video on an uncalibrated TV. This represents most people's use cases.
Score components:
Samsung JS9500 Pre Calibration Picture Samsung JS9500 Pre Gamma Curve Picture Samsung JS9500 Pre Color Picture
White Balance dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of shades of gray.
When it matters: Overall color temperature of all video.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
2.07
Color dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of colors.
When it matters: All colors.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
1.8922
Gamma
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What it is: Brightness of shades of gray.
When it matters: Shadows.
Good value: Between 2.1 and 2.3 (our target is 2.2)
Noticeable difference: 0.1
:
2.13

The white balance isn't far off from the pre-calibration.

9.8 Post Calibration
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What it is: TV's color accuracy after a full calibration with a spectrophotometer.
When it matters: All video on a TV that has been professionally calibrated. This isn't that useful, because most TVs can achieve a pretty good calibration if you spend enough time on them.
Score components:
Samsung JS9500 Post Calibration Picture Samsung JS9500 Post Gamma Curve Picture Samsung JS9500 Post Color Picture
White Balance dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of shades of gray.
When it matters: Overall color temperature of all videos.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
0.31
Color dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of colors.
When it matters: All colors.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
0.4891
Gamma
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What it is: Brightness of shades of gray.
When it matters: Shadows.
Good value: Between 2.1 and 2.3 (our target is 2.2)
Noticeable difference: 0.1
:
2.2

The colors don't get much better than this TV once it has been calibrated.

8.0 480p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 480p input.
When it matters: Standard definition TV, DVDs.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Samsung JS9500 480p Picture

This TV doesn't have any problem upscaling lower-resolution content, DVDs looks good and not too soft.

8.0 720p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 720p input.
When it matters: HD channels, some streaming videos.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Samsung JS9500 720p Picture

Cable content looks also very good and is not too soft either.

9.0 1080p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 1080p input.
When it matters: Blu-rays, streaming video, video files, video games.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Samsung JS9500 1080p Picture

The 1080p upscaling is good. It looks the same as on the cheaper 4k Samsung TVs.

10 4k Input
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What it is: Quality of a 4k UHD input.
When it matters: Streaming video, UHD Blu-rays, some PCs.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Samsung JS9500 4k Picture

Note that to get the full benefit of 4k, you'll need to watch genuine 4k material, and also sit close enough to the TV to see the extra detail. We talk about this in more detail here.

8.2 Color Gamut
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What it is: How many colors the TV can display.
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos and UHD Blu-rays.
Score components:
Wide Color Gamut
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What it is: Whether the TV has an option to enable wide color gamuts.
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos and UHD Blu-rays.
:
Yes
Samsung JS9500 Color Gamut DCI-P3 Picture
DCI P3 xy
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What it is: Coverage of the DCI P3 colorspace on CIE 1931 xy.
When it matters: DCI P3 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
89.83 %
DCI P3 uv
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What it is: Coverage of the DCI P3 colorspace on CIE 1976 u' v'.
When it matters: DCI P3 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
96.23 %
Rec 2020 xy
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What it is: Coverage of the Rec.2020 colorspace on CIE 1931 xy.
When it matters: Rec.2020 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
67.60 %
Rec 2020 uv
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What it is: Coverage of the Rec.2020 colorspace on CIE 1976 u' v'.
When it matters: Rec.2020 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
76.34 %

Selecting 'Native' as the color space increases the gamut quite noticeably. It is still far from the full Rec. 2020, though.

9.0 Reflections
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What it is: How much light is reflected by the TV.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Samsung JS9500 Reflections Picture Samsung JS9500 Bright Room Picture
Reflection
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What it is: Ratio of ambient light reflected by the TV.
When it matters: Ambient light in the room.
Good value: < 1%
Noticeable difference: 0.5%
:
0.7 %
Screen Finish
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What it is: Type of coating on the screen.
When it matters: Bright objects in the direct reflection path (for example, opposite the TV).
Good value: Glossy is good for ambient light, but not for direct reflections.
:
Glossy

The glossy screen does a great job at reducing reflected ambient light. However, direct lights are more defined, and also have a rainbow glare around them.
It can get very bright. It is great for a bright room - unless you have a window right in front of the TV. The reflection will be quite defined, which is distracting.

9.0 3D
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What it is: Optional 3D video capability on TV.
When it matters: 3D movies and videos.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Samsung JS9500 3D Picture
3D
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What it is: If it can display a picture in 3D.
When it matters: 3D movies & videos.
:
Yes
3D Type
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What it is: The 3D technology used by the TV.
When it matters: 3D movies & videos.
Good value: Active have better resolution, but flickers. Passive is more comfortable, but loses half the vertical resolution.
:
Active

The 3D is good. A little bit of crosstalk, but nothing noticeable during normal scenes.

Pixels
8.0

Motion

This TV doesn't have much blur, so it's a good choice for watching your sport of choice.

Even better, it doesn't have much of the blurry, smudgy look that plagues many LED TVs. That kind of thing can make a playing surface - be it a field, or a rink, or a court - look patchy, and also breaks your immersion in whatever you're watching.

8.2 Motion Blur
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What it is: Amount of blur on fast movement.
When it matters: Sports, video games.
Score components:
Samsung JS9500 Motion Blur Picture Samsung JS9500 Response Time Chart
Response Time
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What it is: How quickly pixels can change color.
When it matters: Fast movement.
Good value: < 20ms
Noticeable difference: 10ms
:
15.6 ms
Overshoot
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What it is: When TV’s pixels adjust too far; how quickly they come back.
When it matters: Fast movement.
Good value: < 10ms
Noticeable difference: 10ms
:
0 ms

The JS9500 has very little motion blur. We measured an average response time of 15.6ms, which is quite good. You won't have any problem in sports or video games.

4.8 Image Flicker
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What it is: Luminosity pattern when displaying images
When it matters: Sports, video games, when TV is used as a PC monitor
Score components:
Samsung JS9500 Backlight Picture
PWM Dimming Frequency
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What it is: Flickering pattern at different luminosities.
When it matters: For people sensitive to flickering.
Good value: N/A or high frequencies (> 300 Hz)
:
120 Hz
BFI
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What it is: Option to turn screen black between frames
When it matters: Reduces eye tracking blur in sports or video games
Good value: Yes
:
Yes
BFI Frequency
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What it is: Lowest possible frequency of flickering pattern
When it matters: Reduces eye tracking blur in sports or video games
Good value: 60 Hz
:
60 Hz
BFI In Game Mode
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What it is: Option to insert black frames when in the best settings for gaming
When it matters: Reducing eye tracking blur for video games
Good value: Yes
:
No

7.1 24p Playback
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What it is: Whether 24p content can play without any judder.
When it matters: Only 24p content (mostly just movies).
Judder-free 24p
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What it is: Judder-free movies over 24p signal.
When it matters: Blu-ray and DVD movies; 24 hz PC signal.
:
Yes
Judder-free 24p via 60p
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What it is: Judder-free movies over 60p signal.
When it matters: Movies from streaming devices (Apple TV, Fire TV, etc.); 60 hz PC signal.
:
No
Judder-free 24p via 60i
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What it is: Judder-free movies over 60i signal.
When it matters: Movies from cable/satellite boxes.
:
No

Watching movies over a Blu-ray player in 24p has no judder, but you might see some when watching movies over a 60p or 60i source, because it can't always do the reverse 3:2 pulldown (sometimes it works, but not always). 'Auto Motion Plus' gets rid of this, but it comes with the soap opera effect.

10 Motion Interpolation
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What it is: Also known as 'Soap Opera Effect'. It is an optional feature that increases the frame rate of the video, smoothing movement.
When it matters: If you like the look of smoothed video. Not everyone does.
Motion Interpolation (30 fps)
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What it is: Whether the TV can take a 30 fps input and heighten the frame rate to at least 60 fps.
When it matters: 30 fps or lower videos. Includes movies, TV shows, some video games.
:
Yes
Samsung JS9500 Motion Interpolation (30 fps) Picture
Motion Interpolation (60 fps)
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What it is: Whether the TV can take a 60 fps input and heighten the frame rate to at least 100 fps.
When it matters: 60 fps videos. Includes some video games, some sports channels.
:
Yes
Samsung JS9500 Motion Interpolation (60 fps) Picture

7.6

Inputs

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Score components:

Like most Samsung UHD TVs, the JS9500 has hardly any delay between performing an action in a game and seeing it appear onscreen. If you're playing a game that requires fast reflexes, this is a great TV to be using.

Combined with the minimal motion blur, this is a really good option for people who want a good gaming TV.

7.5 Input Lag
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What it is: Delay between input and onscreen reaction.
When it matters: Video games; when TV is used as PC monitor.
1080p @ 60Hz
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What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV with a 1080p @ 60Hz input.
When it matters: Video games and also when TV is used as PC monitor.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
23.2 ms
1080p With Interpolation
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What it is: Lowest input lag when the motion interpolation feature is turned on.
When it matters: When you want to play video games with the Soap Opera Effect enabled.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
145.5 ms
1080p @ 60Hz Outside Game Mode
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What it is: Input lag in picture modes other than the specific game mode.
When it matters: For playing video games while retaining access to all features of the TV.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
154.6 ms
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
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What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV when displaying 1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
When it matters: PC monitor.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15 ms
:
56.6 ms

In game mode, the input lag is very low. PC mode has a higher input lag of 56.6 ms, which is a bit unfortunate if you want chroma 4:4:4.

8.0 Supported Resolutions
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What it is: Different resolutions supported by TV.
When it matters: PC monitor usage.
Score components:
  • 20% 1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
  • 20% 1080p @ 120Hz
  • 20% 4k @ 30Hz @ 4:4:4
  • 20% 4k @ 60Hz
  • 20% 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Crisp text on 1060p @ 60 hz signal.
When it matters: PC productivity and 60 fps gaming.
:
Yes
1080p @ 120Hz
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What it is: 120 fps 1080p signal supported.
When it matters: PC gaming.
:
No
4k @ 30Hz @ 4:4:4
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What it is: Crisp text on 4k @ 30 hz signal.
When it matters: PC productivity and gaming.
:
Yes
4k @ 60Hz
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What it is: 60 fps 4k signal supported.
When it matters: PC productivity and gaming.
:
Yes
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
Show Help
What it is: Crisp text on 4k @ 60 hz signal.
When it matters: Productivity and 60 fps gaming in 4k.
:
Yes

It doesn't support 1080p @ 120fps, which is a bit of a shame, considering this is Samsung's best TV. To get 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4, you must enable both PC mode and UHD Color.

Side Inputs
Samsung JS9500 Side Inputs Picture

The One Connect box is quite big. It also has a fan inside, which produces a little bit of noise.

Rear Inputs
Samsung JS9500 Rear Inputs Picture

There are only two connections on the TV: the AC power and the One Connect. Everything must go through the One Connect box.

Total Inputs
HDMI : 4
USB : 3
Digital Optical Audio Out : 1
Analog Audio Out 3.5mm : 1
Analog Audio Out RCA : 0
Component In : 1 (incl. adapter, shared)
Composite In : 1 (incl. adapter, shared)
Tuner (Cable/Ant) : 1
Ethernet : 1
DisplayPort : 0
IR In : 1
SD/SDHC : 0

Inputs Specifications
HDR10
Show Help
What it is: Standard HDR format.
When it matters: Most common format. All UHD Blu-ray discs are required to have it.
:
Yes
Dolby Vision
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What it is: Better format, due to its dynamic nature.
When it matters: Currently, only available via streaming.
:
No
5.1 Passthrough ARC Dolby Digital
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What it is: TV can receive and pass Dolby Digital 5.1 signal to receiver via HDMI ARC.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough ARC DTS
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What it is: TV can receive and pass DTS 5.1 signal to receiver via HDMI ARC.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough Optical Dolby Digital
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What it is: TV can receive and pass Dolby Digital signal to receiver via digital optical.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough Optical DTS
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What it is: TV can receive and pass DTS signal to receiver via digital optical.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
HDMI 2.0 Full Bandwith : Yes
ARC : Yes (HDMI 4)
USB 3 : Yes (1)
HDCP 2.2 : Yes
CEC : Yes
MHL : Yes (HDMI 3)
Variable Analog Audio Out : No

6.8

Sound Quality

For TV speakers, the bass you get here is really good. The JS9500 can also get pretty loud.

That said, the sound at high volumes gets pretty distorted, and isn't especially accurate. With quieter volumes, the sound is decently accurate, and there's not much distortion.

Note: Sound Quality test for TVs reviewed before 2017 was performed at 75dB, 85dB, and Max SPL. Starting 2017, the target SPL levels have been changed to 70dB, 80dB, and Max dB SPL.

8.0 Frequency Response
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What it is: Sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: For balanced sound.
Score components:
Samsung JS9500 Frequency Response Picture
Std. Dev. @ 70
Show Help
What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: 70 dB.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
3.34 dB SPL
Std. Dev. @ 80
Show Help
What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: 80 dB.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
3.36 dB SPL
Std. Dev. @ Max
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What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: Max volume.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
5.27 dB SPL
Max
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What it is: Max volume on the TV at a distance of 1 meter.
When it matters: For listening to loud audio.
Good value: > 90 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
91.5 dB SPL
Low-end Cutoff
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What it is: How low of a frequency at which the bass starts.
When it matters: Movies; gaming.
Good value: < 50Hz
Noticeable difference: 10Hz
:
53 Hz

The low-end cut off is excellent for a TV, and it gets loud too. However, the frequency response suffers at higher volumes, most likely due to pumping.

4.4 Total Harmonic Distortion
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What it is: Pureness of a single frequency.
Score components:
Samsung JS9500 Total Harmonic Distortion Picture
Distortion @ 70
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What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 70 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.050
Distortion @ 80
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What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 80 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.358
Distortion @ Max
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What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 85 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.439

The distortion is good at very low listening levels, but it becomes significant as the volume increases.

8.5

Smart Features

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Score components: Subjectively assigned
Samsung JS9500 Smart TV Picture
Smart OS : Tizen

Samsung's smart platform is really good, and the included remote is likewise pretty great. It includes voice and motion controls, so navigation is pretty simple.

Unique to Samsung's and Sony's smart offerings is the 'Playstation Now' game streaming feature. If you connect a DualShock 4 controller to this TV, you'll be able to subscribe to a game streaming service that offers old PlayStation games, playable directly from your TV.

0 Ads
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What it is: Whether or not ads can be found on the TV's smart platform.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
Score components:
Ad-free
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What it is: The TV's ability to provide an ad-free experience.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
:
No
Opt-out
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What it is: Whether you can opt out of the ad services or not. A TV only passes this test if it allows you to remove them completely, not only disable the personalized advertising.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
:
No

Remote
Samsung JS9500 Remote Picture
Remote : Smart

The included remote, which doubles as a cursor pointer, is useful for navigating the smart features. The only downside is the lack of number pad directly on it.

Misc
Power Consumption : 153 W
Power Consumption (Max) : 320.6 W
Firmware : 1217

Conclusion SEE PRICE

The Samsung JS9500 SUHD TV is a great TV overall. It has a wider color gamut and a good full array local dimming backlight. It is very good for video games, due to its low response time and input lag. Unfortunately, the colors lose saturation at an angle and the gray uniformity is sub-par.

Usage Ratings
7.9Mixed Usage
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What it is General purpose. The TV will be used for a variety of content and usages. Movies at night, TV shows during the day, video games from time to time, etc.
Score components:
8.5Movies
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What it is Movies in the dark. The TV will be used for watching movies in a controlled environment, directly in front, in a home theater way. Mostly only high quality content, like Blu-rays, UHD Blu-rays, streaming and a little bit of HDR.
Score components:
7.7TV Shows
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What it is TV Shows in a bright living room. The TV will be used in to watch TV shows, in a bright room during the day, from multiple viewing positions at different angles. The content watched has an average quality: cable, streaming, SD channels, etc.
Score components:
7.5Sports
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What it is Sports in a living room. The TV will be used to watch sports during the day, like football or hockey. Usually watched with a group, so from multiple viewing position.
Score components:
8.0Video Games
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What it is Video games. The TV will be used to play video games, directly in front, in a controlled light environment. Usually fast games, like online FPS, where motion blur and input lag is important.
Score components:
8.2HDR Movies
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What it is HDR Movies and TV shows. The TV will be used to watch 4k UHD HDR content, with a wide color gamut and a high peak brightness. Either via UHD Blu-rays or HDR streaming.
Score components:
8.2HDR Gaming
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What it is HDR Gaming. The TV will be used to play HDR video games using consoles that support it or on current generation gaming PCs. Xbox One S, PS4 Pro, GTX 10 series and AMD RX series graphics cards.
6.9PC Monitor
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What it is PC Monitor. The TV will be used as a PC monitor, from 2-3 feet away, either for productivity purposes or gaming. Sharp text is important, as well as a high resolution.
Score components:
Questions Found an error?

Let us know what is wrong in this question or in the answer.

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Questions & Answers

26 ANSWERED QUESTIONS
26
After reading all the ratings I almost feel like I made a bad decision on buying the 65" 9500. Should I be?
No, the JS9500 is a really great TV, especially if you like local dimming.
21
Additional Review Notes

Local dimming

Here are our test pattern videos for different value of 'Smart LED'. 'High' maintains the same dot luminosity, but creates more blooming. 'Low' and 'Medium' are less aggressive, but also dims the dot.

Smart LED Off

Smart LED High

Smart LED Medium

Smart LED Low

Color Score

We added a new color category to our review. We are using the CR-250-RH spectrophotometer for our measurements.

Currently, there is no score assigned to these tests, but we will add one once we retest all 2015 TVs (which should probably take a week or two). The JS9500's overall score will probably increase after this due to its wider color gamut.

HDR

There are still competing standards for HDR. Once the dust settles a little bit, we will update our review with a better test than the 2% window used in our review.

We also tried a moving white dot on a 50% gray, as shown in the following video. Even with 'Smart LED' set to 'High', it didn't increase the luminosity of the dot, which was a little bit of a letdown because this could represent a sun in a movie scene. Maybe it will be improved in the future via an update, because the backlight can definitely get brighter than that.

Feel free to send us suggestions on how you want us to test the HDR capabilities of TVs.

11
Why is the score of the JS9500 lower than the JU7100? Do you factor in the price in the score?

No, the price is not part of the score. You can see the current formula here.

Keep in mind that currently, the new color test isn't scored. It soon will be, once we finish retesting all the 2015 TVs for color. This should bring up the score of the JS9500.

Picture quality wise, the JS9500 adds a few things compared to the JU7100: the wider color gamut, the full array backlight (better local dimming/HDR) and can get brighter. Besides that, the JU7100 is very similar if not better (like for uniformity).

Update The local dimming is now part of the score. See our latest formula here. The score of the JS9500 is now higher than the JU7100.

6
Why on earth would you test a tv like this with smart led turned off. The feature is there for a reason. The fact you would measure this uniformity with smart LED off makes me question your legitimacy to review tv's at all. Anyone who buys this tv and has smart led turned off is clueless. I've owned this tv for 1+ months and it is outstanding and nowhere near the lousy scores you gave it. The blacks are inky as hell and I don't see much blooming at all. And the HDR with new UHD 4K blu-ray disc is phenomenal. I feel like you may have gotten a bad panel on this review as well so I would suggest getting a new one and run all your tests as the fact that this scores lower then both the JS8500 and JS9000 is ridiculous. I will definitely take your reviews from now on with a grain of salt.
We do test it with smart LED On for some tests. It depends on the tests though. We try to isolate all aspect of the picture quality one test at the time, to keep most variables constant. This is why for black uniformity, we always turn local dimming off: to see the true panel uniformity. We test local dimming separately, and the JS9500 received a 8/10 score in the local dimming test, which is the highest we gave so far.
5
The overall scores of TVs seem to max out at 8.5 on your website. Why is that?
There are inherent flaws in the LCD technology that prevents them from achieving a higher score in our test bench, like uniformity or viewing angle. These TVs, even if they cost a lot of money, are far from perfect.
A higher score is possible. A few plasma TVs achieved 9+ a few years ago, like the Samsung F8500. Our test bench wasn't as exhaustive back then, but they still scored a lot higher than their LCD counterparts.
2
This review was extremely helpful! I have a quick question. I currently have a soundbar, xFinity cable box, PS4, and an apple TV. With other TVs, I would plug all the units into the soundbar receiver, and then have an HDMI cable from the soundbar receiver to the TV. However, this TV is a little different, as it comes with Samsung's Connect One Box.
Would I connect all 4 units to the 4 HDMI inputs in the Connect One Box? Or would I connect the xFinity cable box, PS4, and apple TV to the soundbar receiver, and connect just the soundbar receiver to the Connect One Box? Thanks in advance!
If your receiver can do HDMI ARC, you can do whichever of those you like. ARC lets your TV send an audio signal back to the receiver, so whether you've connected everything to your TV or to your receiver, just make sure the receiver is plugged into your TV's ARC input and, after setting ARC up in the TV, you'll be all set.
2
I purchased the UNJS9500 mid May 2015. I had the Tv professionally calibrated mid July, the Tv is great. Tonight I noticed the picture didn't look right. I went in and look at the settings the the first page in picture settings. They were off from when it was calibrated. I took a picture with my Iphone after calibration, most of the settings had changed. I contacted Samsung Tech support and she said after software updates the settings can change. Do you know anything about this and if that is going to happen, it's a waste to spend the money for calibration. Also is there a way to have the calibration settings locked in so that they won't change during software updates? I love this Tv, but not happy that this has happened.
Settings lost happens from time to time, although it is rare with Samsung TVs (more common on Vizio TVs). Unfortunately, there is no way to prevent this. Taking a picture of the settings post calibration and re entering them is the best way.
1
But what is the color accuracy once the TV is in game mode? I've heard that Samsung's game mode nerfs the picture quality way too much in order to achieve low input lag.
Game mode just turns off some of the processing options, so getting accurate picture is not a problem. Color space is not affected, and you can even still enable the dimming and HDR features with game mode on.
1
I am quite surprised the JU7100 scored higher than the JS9500 according to your tests, considering the JS9500 is widely regarded as one of the BEST TVs available on the Market. Is the gray uniformity so bad that the TV is really not as good as other much cheaper (non-FALD) TVs?
The gray uniformity is not a deal breaker. It is just average for an LED TV (see all our gray uniformity results for 2015 models here). The JS9500 is a great TV, no doubt about that, especially for its local dimming. But it is not the best at everything, and because our overall score is a weighted average, TVs that perform better across our whole test suite end up with a higher score (like the JS8500).
1
So I am having a difficult time deciding between the JS9500 and the X930C. Lets say the cash for either is not important and both are near equal for me to attain. The TV is going in a college apartment room at the bar of my bed nine feet away. For solely my viewing, which would be the TV to have? I'm coming from an old, cheap Samsung I've had since 2008, and want to get another TV I'll be happy with for a near-equal amount of time.
Both are good for everything, but each is slightly better in one area. If you're a serious gamer, the JS9500's lower input lag makes it a better pick. If you're more concerned about picture quality, get the X930C for the better contrast and uniformity.
The X930C also has better speakers, so you can get by without a separate sound system. Both have similar extra features (HDR, wider color gamut), and there's really no bad choice between the two.
0
I'm kind of curious why Samsung decided to make such a huge price difference between their 2015 SUHD from the 65 inch to the 78 inch. Most sites thought it would be around two times more expensive, coming in around $10,000. It's listed as $15,000 on Crutchfield and other sites while the 65 inch is $5499.00. Why is it three times more money? It seems like gouging to me. I would appreciate your input, thanks.
We can't say for sure. They might be trying to squeeze a bit more profit out of the larger size, but it might also just be a matter of production costs pushing the price tag higher than people expected.
0
Please do the JS9000 as well.
We don't currently have a JS9000 in the offices, but we plan on reviewing it within the next couple of months.
0
Hi Cedric, A follow up question to the JU7100/JS9500 comparison, with HDR content wouldn't the JS9500 offer noticeably better PQ? Also, it doesn't seem your tests take into account the effective contrast of the JS9500. I don't have any emotional feelings for the JS9500 and I would seek out the best 1080p display available if I had to get a TV at this time but taking into account FALD, HDR and the WCG I would think the JS9500 is a couple of notches better than the JU7100 in terms of PQ. Of course with 99% content that's currently available the only advantage would be the FALD design. i.e., this is largely a first adopter television.

Yes, HDR will definitely have more pop on the JS9500. But because it is still too early in term of specs and content, the HDR capabilities are not part of our overall score or recommendations.

As for local dimming, we are considering including it in the overall score, but are still not sure about it. For example, I showed a few scenes of the movie 'Tron Legacy' to a new coworker (who is not familiar with TVs, he will test the sound, not the picture) and played with the 'Smart LED' setting. He said he preferred it off, because anyway the content still stayed within what the director of the movie could have done. But in 'Interstellar', he actually liked it because it was hiding the black uniformity flaws.

But anyway, don't forget that you shouldn't look at the overall score for your buying decision. We designed our reviews so you can easily compare the parts that you care about, and ignore the rest. Even if we don't score HDR/Local dimming, we still provide measurements/test results so you can see and judge for yourself. The overall score is just a weighted average of the individual tests; it doesn't fit your needs/preferences.

0
Hi, I was wondering about the contrast ratio portion. Did you get that score with the smart led enabled, or disabled?
Both enabled and disabled gave the same contrast ratio measurement. We use a checkboard pattern (this one) for our measurements. This doesn't favor local dimming unless the zones are small enough, which doesn't seem the case on the JS9500.
0
Do you think the grey uniformity is a firmware fix or hardware problem that can't be fixed? I am considering the UN78JS9500, but before spending a lot of money, I would like to know.
Off viewing axis is not important to me, but the grey uniformity is.
Gray uniformity is a hardware issue, and it's different for every unit. Some will be better than our TV, others will be worse.
The Samsung JS9500 is still a great TV overall. Even if you get a TV with gray uniformity similar to ours, it shouldn't be a dealbreaker, but a downside.
0
Good evening sir. Thank you for all of you great reviews, as well as for taking the time to answer our questions. But, I have another one about the contrast ratio. Theoretically, the contrast ratio of the JS9500 could get a lot better, right? My logic behind that is, the TV can get extremely bright while keeping the blacks black, due to its full-array technology. Am I right in assuming this?
Yes, but it depends on the picture displayed. In the checkboard pattern that we are using, the local dimming didn't make a difference at all in our contrast ratio measurement.
0
Considering you are using standard ANSI pattern to measure native contrast without/with local-dimming engaged, why not also measure native contrast using full-on black/full-on white test patterns?
Most experts agree that neither type of contrast measurement give a perfect assessment of what the viewer actually sees onscreen, considering images are constantly changing, but perhaps by using both types of contrast measurement we can get a fairer reading overall?
The main issue with doing a fully black/fully white screen test is that for the fully black screen, most TVs will shut the screen off completely, and so they'll score very well on a test that is even less representative of typical usage.
We discussed the possibility of putting a white spot on the screen to prevent this, but then that begs the question of where on the screen would be best/fairest for measuring the black level.
All in all, though our current test is not perfect, it's what we feel is the best option we have at present.
0
There must be some way to factor in size with these types of technology. I had a 75" 8550 and a 78" JU7500, both suffered from far more light bleed than users are reporting from the same models in the 65" size and below. This is an obviously flaw in edge-lit LED's. Taking that into consideration in reviews would be very valuable to me, as I suffered through several of these edge-lit models at this size before finally realizing the only technology at this size producing 'some-what' acceptable uniformity is FALD. The importance alone in the differences between sizes coupled with the technology utilized, and how it affects your test, should be at least noted. I would be very lucky to hear your thoughts regarding these differences in the 2015 model tvs and how it could change the ratings.
Indeed, the bigger the TV, the more prone it is to uniformity issues, especially for the black uniformity on edge lit TVs. We often mention this in the Q&A section of our reviews (for example, check the 'Additional Review Notes' of the JU7100).
0
Have Samsung 55JS9000. Love the picture quality, color and motion handling. The off-axis color wash does irk me, though. Have a love seat that sits off to side in the family room. Would it make more sense to exchange for an LG 55EC9300 (1080P) or LG 55EG9600 (4K) OLED? 4K OLED is pricey. What about the LG 55UF9500 LED as an option? I have a 2013 M series Vizio 55" that has decent picture, with better viewing angle than the Samsung. Any suggestions? Thanks for your help.
An OLED (1080p or 4k) would be the best option of the three. IPS TVs like your 2013 M-series are good at an angle, but the overall picture isn't as good.
We haven't reviewed the UF9500, but we don't expect the picture quality will be very good, so we don't recommend it over the OLED options.
Update: The review of the EG9600 is up.
0
I've got up to 10k to put as large as possible of a screen in our multimedia room (We cant get a projector due to my wife refusing to see a projector mounted anywhere). The J9500 is my first guess on the best screen to put in there given its the flagship and will support HDR in the future.
My question is this: As reviewers who have seen A LOT of high quality TVs come through, if I were to tell you you had up to 10k to buy a TV, with the goal it had to be over 70", be great playing games (PC at 4k 4:4:4 is a must), great at watching NFL games, and great for movies (though we have no care for 3D), what would you buy? I leaned towards the J9500 for the local dimming and future HDR support, but I have no issue waiting until 2016 and hoping a better screen appears.
Thank you for your help, I love this site!
Yes, for your needs, the JS9500 is the best choice, since it's good for all of those things. For a cheaper option, the Samsung JU7100 would also work, though it lacks the HDR and color capabilities, and its overall picture is a bit worse.
0
Thank you for all of the reviews you have done. I have come to really trust this site with information. In comparing the the JS9000 with the JS9500, is it worth the extra $1,500 to go for the JS9500? I will be purchasing the 65" version of one of these within the next week, and would love to hear your thoughts on this. It seems, from the reviews, that the JS9000 may be the better buy.
We prefer the JS9000. It has better blacks (both depth and uniformity), less blur, and better color uniformity.
The JS9500 does have a few advantages, though. It has better local dimming, better HDR, and can get a good deal brighter.
If you just want great picture quality, go for the JS9000. If you want to use the extras features, the JS9500's better performance is worth it.
0
Curious about how you guys are testing the HDR brightness. what settings do you have enabled on the tv to reach such high NIT levels? Do you keep backlight at 20? smart LED on high? dynamic contrast? (which will boost nit levels too)
It is the max we can get, whichever the setting. In the case of the JS9500, 'Backlight' at 20, 'Smart LED' at high. 'Dynamic Contrast' didn't change anything, because this is a software based contrast enhancer, so it doesn't touch the 100% white value.
0
You make no mention of the version of the panel. The "T" version panels have noticeably better gray uniformity and are 10 bit, not the 8-bit of the "HU" or "AU" versions. It appears you tested a "HU" version (or worse still an "AU") that isn't representative of the capabilities of this set. There are some very real differences between the panel versions and you should make mention of that for future reference. If you have ever seen the sets side by side, you'd be surprised how much of an improvement the "T" version is. That's why buying the sets online can result in as much as $1000 difference in price between versions. You should make mention of the "Samsung panel lottery". If you're considering a Samsung TV, it's critical to know what the differences are between the various versions and how to get the best TV for your bucks.
We actually have a TS01. We didn't mention the panel lottery in this review because we already talked to great length about this subject in other reviews.
0
Please describe the impact of LED Clear Motion on brightness and motion blur.
It does clarify movement quite a bit. The moving object itself will be clearer, but the length of the trail on the movement does not change.
For an idea of what it looks like, compare this image of the JU7100's regular amount of blur with this image of its blur when LED Clear Motion is on.
The dimming is quite noticeable, so while this is a good feature to use if you watch TV in a dark space, it won't be as useful in bright room situations.
0
I'm looking for the best 65" tv. Debating between the JS9500, JS9000, and EG9600 LG. I know you rated the JS9000 the best, but is the $1000 price difference right now between the 9000 and 9500 worth it? I do watch a lot of sports and am concerned you didn't rate the 9500 as good as the 9000. I also would like to experience the best HDR content. Is there going to be much of a difference between full array and edge lit HDR? I've also been reading that the EG9600 has some judder issues. Money aside, which one should i buy?
We plan to do a review of the EG9600 soon but until then, we can't compare to the other two although we have an idea of how the OLED should perform. The JS9000 have less motion blur than the JS9500 but the later have a full array backlight that will perform better with HDR content (the OLED will have problem getting very bright). You have to chose witch feature is more important to you but $1000 is a steep price for HDR content that still isn't widely available. That said, if price isn't a concern, the JS9500 would be the best of both worlds with better HDR and quite good motion blur.
Update: The review of the EG9600 is up.
0
By default game is bad, but if you adjust all the settings to how you have it in non game mode, the difference is not noticeable.
Yes indeed. Copying the rest of the settings will give you the same result as our settings.
We are not taking any more questions for this product because we no longer have it in our lab.