Reviewed on Nov 06, 2015

LG EG9100
TV REVIEW

Usage Ratings
7.9Mixed Usage
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What it is General purpose. The TV will be used for a variety of content and usages. Movies at night, TV shows during the day, video games from time to time, etc.
Score components:
8.2Movies
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What it is Movies in the dark. The TV will be used for watching movies in a controlled environment, directly in front, in a home theater way. Mostly only high quality content, like Blu-rays, UHD Blu-rays, streaming and a little bit of HDR.
Score components:
7.9TV Shows
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What it is TV Shows in a bright living room. The TV will be used in to watch TV shows, in a bright room during the day, from multiple viewing positions at different angles. The content watched has an average quality: cable, streaming, SD channels, etc.
Score components:
8.1Sports
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What it is Sports in a living room. The TV will be used to watch sports during the day, like football or hockey. Usually watched with a group, so from multiple viewing position.
Score components:
7.7Video Games
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What it is Video games. The TV will be used to play video games, directly in front, in a controlled light environment. Usually fast games, like online FPS, where motion blur and input lag is important.
Score components:
6.0HDR Movies
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What it is HDR Movies and TV shows. The TV will be used to watch 4k UHD HDR content, with a wide color gamut and a high peak brightness. Either via UHD Blu-rays or HDR streaming.
Score components:
7.7HDR Gaming
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What it is HDR Gaming. The TV will be used to play HDR video games using consoles that support it or on current generation gaming PCs. Xbox One S, PS4 Pro, GTX 10 series and AMD RX series graphics cards.
6.8PC Monitor
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What it is PC Monitor. The TV will be used as a PC monitor, from 2-3 feet away, either for productivity purposes or gaming. Sharp text is important, as well as a high resolution.
Score components:
    Table of Contents
  1. Intro
  2. Design
    1. Stand
    2. Borders
    3. Thickness
  3. Picture Quality
    1. Contrast
    2. Local Dimming
    3. SDR Peak Brightness
    4. Gray Uniformity
    5. Viewing Angle
    6. Black Uniformity
    7. Pre Calibration
    8. Post Calibration
    9. 480p Input
    10. 720p Input
    11. 1080p Input
    12. 4k Input
    13. Color Gamut
    14. Reflections
    15. 3D
    16. Pixels
  4. Motion
    1. Motion Blur
    2. Image Flicker
    3. 24p Playback
    4. Motion Interpolation
  5. Inputs
    1. Input Lag
    2. Supported Resolutions
    3. Side Inputs
    4. Rear Inputs
    5. Total Inputs
    6. Inputs Specifications
  6. Sound Quality
    1. Frequency Response
    2. Total Harmonic Distortion
  7. Smart Features
    1. Ads
    2. Remote
    3. Misc
  8. Sizes and Variants
  9. Compared
  10. Conclusion
  11. Q&A
Type : OLED
Resolution : 1080p
Refresh Rate : 120 Hz

The LG OLED EG9100 TV has really excellent picture quality and has even improved compared to the last generation OLED EC9300. However, it still shares the same big flaws, poor uniformity with dark colors, and the screen's brightness varying, depending on the scene.

Test Results
Design 9.0
Picture Quality 8.3
Motion 9.2
Inputs 5.9
Sound Quality 7.0
Smart Features 9.0
Pros
  • Great viewing angle
  • Perfect blacks
  • Perfect motion (but flicker free)
Cons
  • Varying luminosity depending on the scene (ABL)
  • Purple reflections in a very bright room
  • Poor uniformity in the dark shadows
  • Prone to temporary image retention after displaying static images

Check Price

55" 55EG9100 Amazon.co.uk CHECK PRICE Right
9.0

Design

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Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EG9100 Design Picture
Curved : Yes

While the top part of the LG 55EG9100 OLED is very thin, the bottom section is of average thickness. The borders are really thin. The back of the TV is cream white. The stand is stable and relatively small compared to the current trend of wide stands, so you won't have any problem fitting it on most tables.

Stand
LG EG9100 Stand Picture

Dimension of the 55" TV stand: 26" x 8"

Borders
LG EG9100 Borders Picture
Borders : 0.35" (0.9 cm)

Thickness
LG EG9100 Thickness Picture
Max Thickness : 2.80" (7.1 cm)

8.3

Picture Quality

OLED TVs really excel in picture quality, and the LG EG9100 is no exception. The blacks are perfect; the pixels don't emit any light, resulting in an infinite contrast ratio. It also has fancier features like motion interpolation, 3D, and even a wider color gamut. It deals well with reflections and picture quality remains good even when viewed fron the side. Unfortunately it doesn't get very bright.

10 Contrast
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What it is: Brightness difference between white and black. This is the main component of picture quality.
When it matters: Always, but especially when watching dark scenes.
Score components:
Black
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What it is: How much light pure black emits.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Good value: < 0.040 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 0.010 cd/m2
:
0 cd/m2
White
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What it is: White brightness of our calibration.
When it matters: It doesn't matter much. This is mainly to standardize our black and contrast ratio measurements.
Good value: Close to our 100 cd/m2 target.
Noticeable difference: 20 cd/m2
:
98.53 cd/m2
Contrast
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What it is: Ratio of the white brightness divided by the blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes in a dark room.
Good value: > 3,000
Noticeable difference: 500
:
Inf : 1

The blacks are really black. Even if you have one light on, you can see the difference in the black levels compared with an LED TV.

10 Local Dimming
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What it is: The lights behind the LCD layer adapt to the picture displayed, improving the contrast ratio.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
Local Dimming
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What it is: Whether it has a feature that controls the LEDs behind the LCD layer, to match the picture and darkens the dark portion of it.
When it matters: On LED TVs only. Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
:
No
Backlight
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What it is: Configuration of the lights of the backlight.
When it matters: Effectiveness of the local dimming.
Good value: Full-array/direct lighting is better for local dimming. As for the uniformity of the screen, it depends on the implementation. Some edge-lit TVs have more uniform blacks than some full-array TVs.
:
N/A

For consistency between our reviews, we filmed our local dimming test pattern on this TV, even though it technically doesn't have local dimming.

5.9 SDR Peak Brightness
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What it is: How bright the screen can get. Measured with local dimming and with SDR content.
When it matters: Bright living rooms; bright objects; SDR content.
SDR Peak 2% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright highlights, present on screen for a short time; especially for SDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
336 cd/m2
SDR Peak 10% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright objects, present on screen for a short time; especially for SDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
331 cd/m2
SDR Peak 25% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms; bright objects in SDR video.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
330 cd/m2
SDR Peak 50% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
172 cd/m2
SDR Peak 100% Window
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What it is: The maximum luminosity, even if only maintained for a short time, of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
81 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 2% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 2% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright highlights, persistent throughout a scene; especially for SDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
336 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 10% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 10% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright objects, persistent throughout a scene; especially for HDR content.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
331 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 25% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 25% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms; bright objects in SDR video.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
330 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 50% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 50% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
172 cd/m2
SDR Sustained 100% Window
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What it is: The lowest maximum luminosity (usually after it has stabilized) of a white square covering 100% of the screen, with the TV set to be as bright as possible. Measured with local dimming and over SDR signal.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Good value: > 400 cd/m2
Noticeable difference: 100 cd/m2
:
81 cd/m2

As with other OLED TVs, the LG 55EG9100's luminosity changes depending on what is displayed on the screen. This is called ABL (Automatic Brightness Limiter) and it cannot be disabled. When a small white square is displayed, and with 'OLED Light' to the max, it is able to attain a brightness of 336.4 cd/m2. However, it cannot maintain that luminosity on a fully bright screen - it drops to 80.63 cd/m2. More on this in the Q&A section of our review. For HDR, what this means is the luminosity of the highlights will change drastically depending on the scene.

8.9 Gray Uniformity
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What it is: Evenness of colors onscreen (not just gray).
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Score components:
LG EG9100 50% Uniformity Picture
50% Std. Dev.
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What it is: Average squared difference of pixels when displaying a mid 50% gray.
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Good value: < 2.5%
Noticeable difference: 1%
:
1.201 %
50% DSE
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What it is: High-frequency variance of uniformity. Dark spots on the screen.
When it matters: Solid colors. Sports, panning shots.
Good value: < 0.165%
Noticeable difference: 0.025%
:
0.113 %

The colors are more uniform than on an LED TV, but they're still not perfect. 50% gray and brighter is quite good, but things get uglier the lower the brightness gets. The TV also suffers from temporary image retention. More on this in the Q&A section.

8.0 Viewing Angle
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What it is: Color accuracy when viewed from the side.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Score components:
LCD Type
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What it is: Type of LCD technology used by the TV.
When it matters: Different technologies have different viewing angle properties.
Good value: IPS maintains good color accuracy at an angle, but has a poor contrast ratio from in front. VA has great picture quality in front, but loses saturation at an angle.
:
N/A
Color Shift
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What it is: Angle where the colors noticeable shift compared to when viewed from directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
35 °
Brightness
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What it is: Angle where the brightness drops to 50% of the brightness directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
68 °
Black Level
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What it is: Angle where the black level drops to 50% of the black level directly in front of the TV. 0 ° means directly facing the TV. Measurements are up to a maximum of 75 °.
When it matters: Large living rooms with multiple viewing positions.
Good value: > 50°
Noticeable difference: 10°
:
75 °

The viewing angle is really great. Unlike the LG 55EC9300, it doesn't get a yellow tint at a wide angle.

Update 01/06/2017: We have changed the methodology of testing. Since this is an old TV which we don't have anymore, we extrapolated the results from 2016 TVs.

10 Black Uniformity
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What it is: Evenness of blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Score components:
LG EG9100 Black Uniformity Picture
Std. Dev.
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What it is: Average of the squared difference of the blacks.
When it matters: Dark scenes viewed in a dark room.
Good value: < 2%
Noticeable difference: 1%, but keep in mind that it varies a lot by unit, even of the same model; yours likely will not end up exactly like ours.
:
0.380 %

The uniformity of pure black is perfect. However, with dark colors that are even a bit lighter than pure black, the good uniformity goes away (more on this in the Q&A section).

8.9 Pre Calibration
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What it is: TV's color accuracy before a full calibration. Only the picture mode and backlight level were changed.
When it matters: All video on an uncalibrated TV. This represents most people's use cases.
Score components:
LG EG9100 Pre Calibration Picture LG EG9100 Pre Gamma Curve Picture LG EG9100 Pre Color Picture
White Balance dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of shades of gray.
When it matters: Overall color temperature of all video.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
2.36
Color dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of colors.
When it matters: All colors.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
1.5682
Gamma
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What it is: Brightness of shades of gray.
When it matters: Shadows.
Good value: Between 2.1 and 2.3 (our target is 2.2)
Noticeable difference: 0.1
:
2.34

9.8 Post Calibration
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What it is: TV's color accuracy after a full calibration with a spectrophotometer.
When it matters: All video on a TV that has been professionally calibrated. This isn't that useful, because most TVs can achieve a pretty good calibration if you spend enough time on them.
Score components:
LG EG9100 Post Calibration Picture LG EG9100 Post Gamma Curve Picture LG EG9100 Post Color Picture
White Balance dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of shades of gray.
When it matters: Overall color temperature of all videos.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
0.23
Color dE
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What it is: Average inaccuracy of colors.
When it matters: All colors.
Good value: < 3
Noticeable difference: 1
:
0.6124
Gamma
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What it is: Brightness of shades of gray.
When it matters: Shadows.
Good value: Between 2.1 and 2.3 (our target is 2.2)
Noticeable difference: 0.1
:
2.19

8.0 480p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 480p input.
When it matters: Standard definition TV, DVDs.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EG9100 480p Picture

DVDs looks good once upscaled.

8.0 720p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 720p input.
When it matters: HD channels, some streaming videos.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EG9100 720p Picture

Cable TV and other 720p content will be upscaled without any issues.

10 1080p Input
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What it is: Quality of a 1080p input.
When it matters: Blu-rays, streaming video, video files, video games.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EG9100 1080p Picture

Native 1080p content like Blu-rays looks good on this TV. The smaller size of the pixels creates a screen door effect, which gives everything a 'rough' look, but this is not related to the resolution of the content played.

0 4k Input
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What it is: Quality of a 4k UHD input.
When it matters: Streaming video, UHD Blu-rays, some PCs.
Score components: Subjectively assigned

7.6 Color Gamut
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What it is: How many colors the TV can display.
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos and UHD Blu-rays.
Score components:
Wide Color Gamut
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What it is: Whether the TV has an option to enable wide color gamuts.
When it matters: HDR content. Includes some streaming videos and UHD Blu-rays.
:
Yes
LG EG9100 Color Gamut DCI-P3 Picture
DCI P3 xy
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What it is: Coverage of the DCI P3 colorspace on CIE 1931 xy.
When it matters: DCI P3 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
85.30 %
DCI P3 uv
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What it is: Coverage of the DCI P3 colorspace on CIE 1976 u' v'.
When it matters: DCI P3 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
91.67 %
Rec 2020 xy
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What it is: Coverage of the Rec.2020 colorspace on CIE 1931 xy.
When it matters: Rec.2020 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
61.43 %
Rec 2020 uv
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What it is: Coverage of the Rec.2020 colorspace on CIE 1976 u' v'.
When it matters: Rec.2020 content. Includes HDR, UHD Blu-rays.
Good value: > 90%
Noticeable difference: 5%
:
64.02 %

9.0 Reflections
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What it is: How much light is reflected by the TV.
When it matters: Bright rooms.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EG9100 Reflections Picture LG EG9100 Bright Room Picture
Reflection
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What it is: Ratio of ambient light reflected by the TV.
When it matters: Ambient light in the room.
Good value: < 1%
Noticeable difference: 0.5%
:
0.4 %
Screen Finish
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What it is: Type of coating on the screen.
When it matters: Bright objects in the direct reflection path (for example, opposite the TV).
Good value: Glossy is good for ambient light, but not for direct reflections.
:
Glossy

It does a great job at cutting reflections, but the screen finish is glossy and it has a purple tint. The curve creates a lens effect that zooms in on the reflections, so you will want to avoid having a lamp or window directly in the reflection path.
The maximum luminosity varies depending on the scene. Usually, this isn't an issue, but when displaying white on 50% of the screen, the maximum luminosity is not as high as on an LED TV.

9.0 3D
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What it is: Optional 3D video capability on TV.
When it matters: 3D movies and videos.
Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EG9100 3D Picture
3D
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What it is: If it can display a picture in 3D.
When it matters: 3D movies & videos.
:
Yes
3D Type
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What it is: The 3D technology used by the TV.
When it matters: 3D movies & videos.
Good value: Active have better resolution, but flickers. Passive is more comfortable, but loses half the vertical resolution.
:
Passive

There is absolutely no crosstalk when viewing this TV from in front. However, only 1 out of 2 lines is presented to each eye, which is more evident on a 1080p OLED TV, because the pixels are smaller than they are on traditional LED TVs.

Pixels
9.2

Motion

This LG is really great at handling motion There is absolutely no trail following moving objects. It is able to interpolate motion for those that like the soap opera effect. Movies from a blu-ray player or the in-built apps play smoothly.

10 Motion Blur
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What it is: Amount of blur on fast movement.
When it matters: Sports, video games.
Score components:
LG EG9100 Motion Blur Picture LG EG9100 Response Time Chart
Response Time
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What it is: How quickly pixels can change color.
When it matters: Fast movement.
Good value: < 20ms
Noticeable difference: 10ms
:
0.1 ms
Overshoot
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What it is: When TV’s pixels adjust too far; how quickly they come back.
When it matters: Fast movement.
Good value: < 10ms
Noticeable difference: 10ms
:
0 ms

The response time is perfect, and unlike the EC9300 that we tested, it doesn't have any overshoot. It doesn't flicker though, as you can see in our "backlight" measurement. Some people don't like the look of flicker-free motion. You can read more info about the motion blur on OLED TVs in the 'Additional Review Notes' of the review of the EC9300.

4.0 Image Flicker
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What it is: Luminosity pattern when displaying images
When it matters: Sports, video games, when TV is used as a PC monitor
Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EG9100 Backlight Picture
PWM Dimming Frequency
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What it is: Flickering pattern at different luminosities.
When it matters: For people sensitive to flickering.
Good value: N/A or high frequencies (> 300 Hz)
:
N/A
BFI
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What it is: Option to turn screen black between frames
When it matters: Reduces eye tracking blur in sports or video games
Good value: Yes
:
No
BFI Frequency
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What it is: Lowest possible frequency of flickering pattern
When it matters: Reduces eye tracking blur in sports or video games
Good value: 60 Hz
:
N/A
BFI In Game Mode
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What it is: Option to insert black frames when in the best settings for gaming
When it matters: Reducing eye tracking blur for video games
Good value: Yes
:
No

7.1 24p Playback
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What it is: Whether 24p content can play without any judder.
When it matters: Only 24p content (mostly just movies).
Judder-free 24p
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What it is: Judder-free movies over 24p signal.
When it matters: Blu-ray and DVD movies; 24 hz PC signal.
:
Yes
Judder-free 24p via 60p
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What it is: Judder-free movies over 60p signal.
When it matters: Movies from streaming devices (Apple TV, Fire TV, etc.); 60 hz PC signal.
:
No
Judder-free 24p via 60i
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What it is: Judder-free movies over 60i signal.
When it matters: Movies from cable/satellite boxes.
:
No

It is able to display 24p movies without judder, but only over 24 hz signals. 'TruMotion' is the motion interpolation feature.

10 Motion Interpolation
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What it is: Also known as 'Soap Opera Effect'. It is an optional feature that increases the frame rate of the video, smoothing movement.
When it matters: If you like the look of smoothed video. Not everyone does.
Motion Interpolation (30 fps)
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What it is: Whether the TV can take a 30 fps input and heighten the frame rate to at least 60 fps.
When it matters: 30 fps or lower videos. Includes movies, TV shows, some video games.
:
Yes
LG EG9100 Motion Interpolation (30 fps) Picture
Motion Interpolation (60 fps)
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What it is: Whether the TV can take a 60 fps input and heighten the frame rate to at least 100 fps.
When it matters: 60 fps videos. Includes some video games, some sports channels.
:
Yes
LG EG9100 Motion Interpolation (60 fps) Picture

5.9

Inputs

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Score components:

The input lag is average, but still not noticeable for most people. It is a 1080p TV and so doesn't support higher resolution inputs. It supports chroma 4:4:4 for sharp text.

6.6 Input Lag
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What it is: Delay between input and onscreen reaction.
When it matters: Video games; when TV is used as PC monitor.
1080p @ 60Hz
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What it is: Lowest input lag possible on TV with a 1080p @ 60Hz input.
When it matters: Video games and also when TV is used as PC monitor.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
43.5 ms
1080p With Interpolation
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What it is: Lowest input lag when the motion interpolation feature is turned on.
When it matters: When you want to play video games with the Soap Opera Effect enabled.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
110.9 ms
1080p @ 60Hz Outside Game Mode
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What it is: Input lag in picture modes other than the specific game mode.
When it matters: For playing video games while retaining access to all features of the TV.
Good value: < 40ms
Noticeable difference: 15ms
:
110.8 ms

Labeling the input with the PC icon brings the input lag down to 43.5 ms on the LG 55EG9100. Game mode has a slightly higher input lag of 52.4 ms.
Update 07/25/2016 We've received a report that the input lag is now 29.6 ms after the firmware update 04.01.00. We don't have that TV anymore to confirm this unfortunately.

2.0 Supported Resolutions
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What it is: Different resolutions supported by TV.
When it matters: PC monitor usage.
Score components:
  • 20% 1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
  • 20% 1080p @ 120Hz
  • 20% 4k @ 30Hz @ 4:4:4
  • 20% 4k @ 60Hz
  • 20% 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
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What it is: Crisp text on 1060p @ 60 hz signal.
When it matters: PC productivity and 60 fps gaming.
:
Yes
1080p @ 120Hz
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What it is: 120 fps 1080p signal supported.
When it matters: PC gaming.
:
No
4k @ 30Hz @ 4:4:4
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What it is: Crisp text on 4k @ 30 hz signal.
When it matters: PC productivity and gaming.
:
No
4k @ 60Hz
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What it is: 60 fps 4k signal supported.
When it matters: PC productivity and gaming.
:
No
4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
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What it is: Crisp text on 4k @ 60 hz signal.
When it matters: Productivity and 60 fps gaming in 4k.
:
No

To get chroma 4:4:4 in 1080p, you will need to label the HDMI with the PC icon, which is good because it is also the way you get the lowest input lag.

Side Inputs
Rear Inputs
Total Inputs
HDMI : 3
USB : 3
Digital Optical Audio Out : 1
Analog Audio Out 3.5mm : 0
Analog Audio Out RCA : 0
Component In : 1 (incl. adapter)
Composite In : 1 (incl. adapter)
Tuner (Cable/Ant) : 1
Ethernet : 1
DisplayPort : 0
IR In : 0
SD/SDHC : 0

Inputs Specifications
HDR10
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What it is: Standard HDR format.
When it matters: Most common format. All UHD Blu-ray discs are required to have it.
:
No
Dolby Vision
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What it is: Better format, due to its dynamic nature.
When it matters: Currently, only available via streaming.
:
No
5.1 Passthrough ARC Dolby Digital
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What it is: TV can receive and pass Dolby Digital 5.1 signal to receiver via HDMI ARC.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough ARC DTS
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What it is: TV can receive and pass DTS 5.1 signal to receiver via HDMI ARC.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough Optical Dolby Digital
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What it is: TV can receive and pass Dolby Digital signal to receiver via digital optical.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
5.1 Passthrough Optical DTS
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What it is: TV can receive and pass DTS signal to receiver via digital optical.
When it matters: 5.1 audio on DVDs and Blu-rays.
:
Yes
HDMI 2.0 Full Bandwith : No
ARC : Yes (HDMI 3)
USB 3 : No
HDCP 2.2 : No
CEC : Yes
MHL : No
Variable Analog Audio Out : No

7.0

Sound Quality

The sound is pretty accurate, and doesn't get very distorted. Unfortunately, it can't get loud, and the bass is poor.

Note: Sound Quality test for TVs reviewed before 2017 was performed at 75dB, 85dB, and Max SPL. Starting 2017, the target SPL levels have been changed to 70dB, 80dB, and Max dB SPL.

6.8 Frequency Response
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What it is: Sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: For balanced sound.
Score components:
LG EG9100 Frequency Response Picture
Std. Dev. @ 70
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What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: 70 dB.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
5.00 dB SPL
Std. Dev. @ 80
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What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: 80 dB.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
4.48 dB SPL
Std. Dev. @ Max
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What it is: Variance of the sound level at different frequencies.
When it matters: Max volume.
Good value: < 4 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
4.85 dB SPL
Max
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What it is: Max volume on the TV at a distance of 1 meter.
When it matters: For listening to loud audio.
Good value: > 90 dB
Noticeable difference: 2 dB
:
88.6 dB SPL
Low-end Cutoff
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What it is: How low of a frequency at which the bass starts.
When it matters: Movies; gaming.
Good value: < 50Hz
Noticeable difference: 10Hz
:
113 Hz

Decent frequency response all-around, but poor bass extension and low maximum volume.

7.4 Total Harmonic Distortion
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What it is: Pureness of a single frequency.
Score components:
LG EG9100 Total Harmonic Distortion Picture
Distortion @ 70
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What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 70 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.021
Distortion @ 80
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What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 80 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.010
Distortion @ Max
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What it is: Amount of distortion.
When it matters: 85 dB.
Good value: < 0.100
Noticeable difference: 0.100
:
0.027

Very good distortion results, but the TV doesn't get loud.

9.0

Smart Features

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Score components: Subjectively assigned
LG EG9100 Smart TV Picture
Smart OS : WebOS

It features LG's WebOS smart platform, which is great. The remote can even be used as a mouse pointer. You can see our review of WebOS here.

0 Ads
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What it is: Whether or not ads can be found on the TV's smart platform.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
Score components:
Ad-free
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What it is: The TV's ability to provide an ad-free experience.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
:
No
Opt-out
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What it is: Whether you can opt out of the ad services or not. A TV only passes this test if it allows you to remove them completely, not only disable the personalized advertising.
When it matters: When using the smart features.
:
No

Remote
LG EG9100 Remote Picture
Remote : Smart

Misc
Power Consumption : 77 W
Power Consumption (Max) : 116 W
Firmware : 04.00.30

Conclusion Amazon.co.uk CHECK PRICE Right

7.9Mixed Usage
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What it is General purpose. The TV will be used for a variety of content and usages. Movies at night, TV shows during the day, video games from time to time, etc.
Score components:
Great for mixed usage. Excellent picture quality for watching movies or TV and handles motion very well. Unfortunately it can't get very bright.
8.2Movies
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What it is Movies in the dark. The TV will be used for watching movies in a controlled environment, directly in front, in a home theater way. Mostly only high quality content, like Blu-rays, UHD Blu-rays, streaming and a little bit of HDR.
Score components:
Movie performance is very good. Dark appear rich with perfect blacks and contrast. Excellent picture quality.
7.9TV Shows
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What it is TV Shows in a bright living room. The TV will be used in to watch TV shows, in a bright room during the day, from multiple viewing positions at different angles. The content watched has an average quality: cable, streaming, SD channels, etc.
Score components:
Great for watching TV. Picture quality remains great when watched from anywhere in the room. Deals well with reflections but unfortunately can't get very bright to stand out in a bright room.
8.1Sports
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What it is Sports in a living room. The TV will be used to watch sports during the day, like football or hockey. Usually watched with a group, so from multiple viewing position.
Score components:
Great sports performance. Almost perfect response for great motion handling. Great picture quality. Unfortunately the screen dims when viewing large bright scenes such as hockey.
7.7Video Games
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What it is Video games. The TV will be used to play video games, directly in front, in a controlled light environment. Usually fast games, like online FPS, where motion blur and input lag is important.
Score components:
Great for video gamers. For fast paced games there is almost no motion blur. Input lag is average but should not be an issue for most people.
6.0HDR Movies
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What it is HDR Movies and TV shows. The TV will be used to watch 4k UHD HDR content, with a wide color gamut and a high peak brightness. Either via UHD Blu-rays or HDR streaming.
Score components:
Average HDR performance. Supports a wide color gamut but can't get very bright. Picture quality is great.
7.7HDR Gaming
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What it is HDR Gaming. The TV will be used to play HDR video games using consoles that support it or on current generation gaming PCs. Xbox One S, PS4 Pro, GTX 10 series and AMD RX series graphics cards.
6.8PC Monitor
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What it is PC Monitor. The TV will be used as a PC monitor, from 2-3 feet away, either for productivity purposes or gaming. Sharp text is important, as well as a high resolution.
Score components:
Good PC monitor. Limited to 120Hz but has very good picture quality and average input lag. Almost no motion blur. Supports chroma 4:4:4 for sharp text.
Questions Found an error?

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Questions & Answers

45 ANSWERED QUESTIONS
71
Additional Review Notes

EG9100 vs EC9300

Besides the design change, the LG 55EG9100 is really the same as an older OLED model, the LG 55EC9300. All our measurements fall either under the variance between units or under the 'not noticeable in real life' threshold. The only difference in terms of picture quality is that the EG9100 doesn't get a yellow tint at an angle. If you are choosing between the two, get the newer EG9100, unless the price difference is substantial.

Automatic Brightness Limiter (ABL)

The screen luminosity varies depending on what is displayed on the screen. We measured pure white, with 'OLED Light' set to the max, with the window taking up different portions of the screen:

Window sizeLuminosity
2%336.4 cd/m2
5%336.0 cd/m2
10%331.2 cd/m2
18%330.8 cd/m2
25%330.0 cd/m2
50%172.1 cd/m2
100%80.6 cd/m2

You can see that the luminosity drops suddenly when a majority of the screen is bright.

This is noticeable with everyday usage, but mostly only when you look for it.

Poor dark color uniformity

The darker the color, the worse the uniformity gets. Here is a screenshot of a very dark (10%) and dark (20%) gray:

10% gray

LG OLED eg9100 20p

20% gray

LG OLED eg9100 20p

You can see a few colored bands on the screen. This is constantly changing, though, so it will be a bit different day to day.

Most of the time, you won't be bothered by this. It is still better than all LED TVs in term of overall uniformity.

It's also worth noting that this TV is prone to image retention. Even leaving a picture up for only a few seconds can lead to it. It's nothing to worry about, though. It goes away pretty fast when the TV is displaying normal content.

44
Since this TV is not 4K, will it be obsolete in a few years? For instance, if most content delivered by DirecTV goes to 4K, what will be shown on this TV? I have been debating between this set and the Samsung UN55JS8500, but am leery due to the lack of 4K, and can't imagine that the extra money to get the LG OLED 4K is possible. The seating area is about 8 ft from the TV. Thanks.
We're a long way off from 4k content being the norm, and even then, it won't be an issue. For example, all current Blu-rays players can output at the lower resolution of 720p, the players simply downscale the signal. There's no need to worry about skipping 4k for OLED, and given that OLED's picture quality is as great as it is, it's really a pretty good idea.
17
Thanks for the review, again. Very thorough as always even though it seems like the EC9300 carbon copy, besides that yellow tint. I'm glad you guys are aware of the banding issues on these LG OLED sets that I've been reading about on AVS forums.
Although, I don't think any of these TVs deserve a 8.9 for Video Games. Yes the response time and motion blur are great but input lag is should carry more weight in the scoring for this category then those other two do. It's the most important thing when it comes to gaming, and I don't see LG improving on this :( especially when LG reps see their TVs are supposedly exceptional like it says on this review. Honestly I wish some of the press would give LG a nudge for us gamers. 4:4:4 chroma while in game mode with sub 20 ms of lag should be achievable, if LG engineers even cared.
OLED TVs can be a master of all trades if the manufacturers wanted it to be. The best TV technology for movies, sports, and games. Imagine that.
Thanks for the feedback. You can see our weights for the video games score here. Currently, the input lag accounts for 31% of it. Weights are always tricky because it varies per person, so we need to aim to match the preference of the majority. With a 8.9 scores for video games, the EG9100 currently ranks #5 in that category, which seems fair considering it has perfect response time and a 43.5 ms input lag isn't that bad (most gamers won't even notice it).
Of course, a sub 20ms would be even better, and hopefully LG achieves it in the future. It would be cool also if they added a controllable flickering for motion, or even better, if it supported 1080p@120fps.
Feel free to propose new weights for the scoring. Maybe in the future we could add a tool so you can set your own weights on the website to personalize the score.
17
I have narrowed my search between the LG EG9100, the Samsung JS9000 55", and the Samsung JS8500 55". I mostly watch sports, DirecTv, movies, and occasionally stream. My viewing distance is about 11'. All 3 models are currently in the same price range. What would you recommend? Thank you for your amazing site!
At your distance and size, 4k doesn't make a big difference, so opt for the LG EG9100 instead. You will appreciate the better picture quality of OLED instead of the higher resolution of the LED TVs you mentioned.
10
What's the status on wall mounts for this TV? Do I have to use the OTW150 from LG? I can't find any info on the VESA compatibility of this TV other than the Easy Slim designation by LG. I don't want to have to spend 100 bucks on a mount!
Unfortunately, it looks like you do need to buy that mount.
8
Can you address the life span of OLED? I read that the blue pixel is only projected to last 15,000 hours. Have they improved this?

LG's OLED TVs use a different kind of OLED technology where they use white photo-emissive organic material in combination with color filters to create the red, green and blue colors. This way, they don't need to use blue organic materials and thus can achieve a much longer lifespan.

Other type of OLED panels that use blue organic materials may have shorter lifespan though, since blues do degrade faster. In any case, the 15,000 hour number as the worst case scenario, that only runs out after around 14 years (based on an average of around 1,020 hours viewed per year), which is longer than most people keep a TV anyway.

6
I was surprised to see a score of 8.8 for Gray Uniformity considering what appears to be a significant amount of pink tint on the left and right sides in the screenshot. My second EG9100 was very pink on the left third of the screen which was very apparent in normal content so I regrettably returned it. It had minor vertical banding as well but it was very difficult to see. (My first one had significant vertical banding near the middle of the screen that was easy to see in normal content plus it suffered from pink tint to a lesser degree) Do you have any thoughts on this?
Our score of gray uniformity is automatically calculated based on the standard deviation of the pixels of the picture we took. See here for our formula. The deviation of the colors is included in that number (all RGB channels are treated equal in the std. dev. formula). The result was a standard deviation of 1.201%, which while not perfect, is less bad than every other TVs that we reviewed. But as you saw for yourself, the uniformity issues on OLED is different than on LED TVs. On LED TVs, usually the colors stay consistent, but there are a lot of darker spots/edges. On OLED TVs, the luminosity is a lot more constant, but the colors shifts more.
6
Does labeling the input as PC or setting it to game mode cause any detriment to the picture quality? Are you able to use the Expert1 picture settings if the input is labeled as PC and still get 43.5 ms of lag? That would seem too good to be true. Also, does the PC label affect how the TV communicates with a receiver via ARC?
It doesn't make the picture objectively worse. It just means some extra features won't be accessible (and we don't recommend using those anyway). And yes, you can use Expert1 in PC mode and still get low input lag.
ARC works fine regardless of whether the inputs are in PC mode. Just be sure to have 'SimpLink' enabled on your TV, or else ARC won't work.
6
I previously owned a 55" Panasonic GT30 plasma for 3 years and loved the quality, I just purchased the 55EG9100 for $1,800 and looks even better. I sit 7-10 feet away depending on seating. I mostly watch movies and play video games (PS4). A part of me wants a bigger TV 65" and 4K HDR. I see the JS8500 is about the same price now, do you think I should get a bigger 4k led or stay with the quality of 1080p oled? Other question is should I pay extra for the 55EG9500 oled to get 4k and HDR? My concerned is black level uniformity and brightness. Thank you and your site is very informative compared to others.
If you care about black level uniformity, you shouldn't upgrade. The JS8500 black uniformity is pretty good for an LED, but it is not in the same ballpark as an OLED or plasma. As for the upgrade to the 55EG9600, at your distance you will see a slight difference for 4k, but it won't be big and only apparent when watching native 4k content. Overall, you are probably better sticking with your 55EG9100 for a few years until you can get a bigger 4k OLED.
6
I got the EG9100 yesterday and I was wondering what tests can I run to see if any issues like vignetting or banding plague my set? I can see that on a pure white screen, the edges have a shade of pink/purple and I can see a distinct band of pure white in the center of the display. I am not sure if this is due to calibration or curve of the TV. Have you had any such issues on your set?
This is normal for OLED TVs, and we have had similar issues with all the OLED sets we have tested.
It's unlikely that OLED's uniformity issues will be a problem with most content, but if you want to get a better look at the issues, display this image on the screen. It should make imperfections more noticeable.
5
Is there any big difference in eg9100 and ec9300? How long do oled screens last?
No, they have about the same picture quality. As for the longevity, it is impossible to tell. Technically, they are rated for 10,000-30,000 hours (depending on where you look and which colors). This is more than enough for a normal usage for a decade, but if you have your TV open all day long, every day, OLED isn't a good idea.
5
PC mode has lower lag time for games, but is it as good as game mode for picture quality?
Yes, it is the same.
4
How does the motion handling for sports compare to that of the Samsung F8500 plasma?
It is different, but most people will prefer the OLED for motion. The response time is a lot better on the OLED, so there is absolutely no trail on the movements (on plasmas, like the F8500, you can sometime see a phosphor trail). However, the main difference is the OLED doesn't flicker at all, while plasmas flickers a lot. This can be either a good or bad thing depending on your personal preference. Flickering makes the picture more define when your eyes are following a moving object. But it also increases the feeling of shuttering, especially on lower framerate materals (less bad on 1080i sports channels).
4
I want to place the TV in the corner of the room and was hoping to mount a Sonos playbar below. I'm limited to 55" because of space in the corner and concerned with trying to get the best picture for normal (cable and bluray) viewing. Not a gamer or streamer. I feel limited with the single, non articulated, LG mount available for their OLED models. I sit more than 12' away so was initially thought 4K was unnecessary and was considering the EG9100 over the JS8500, but with the corner mounting limitation and Sonos playbar attachment feel forced to go LED LCD. Not sure if I need to just leave the EG9100 as a table top on stand and buy an entertainment center that accommodates the Sonos? What's your thoughts on a best solution? Thanks.
You can use any wall mount with the LG OLED, you just need to connect the special LG oled mount on top of it. It is a little bit more work depending on the mount, but if you don't mind it, get the LG EG9100.
3
Is ABL active when brightness is set to or below 80.6 cd/m2? If it's not, then this is a good workaround for the issue.
Unfortunately, the ABL is even active when 'OLED LIGHT' is set to the minimum.
3
I have heard that the EG9100 has "pixel dimming" and "ultra luminance," and that the EC9300 doesn't. Do these features make the $500 price difference between the two worth it?
These are mostly just marketing words. "Pixel Dimming" just means the pixels are self-emitting, which is true on all OLED TVs. "Ultra Luminance" refers to HDR, but both TVs have relatively the same max luminosity. The EG9100 is better yes, but not $500 better. Stick to the cheaper of the two.
3
I love my one month old EG9100 with one exception: it makes its own volume adjustments as I go from channel to channel. Is there a way to have all channels play at the same level?
Yes. Turn on 'Auto Volume' under 'Sound' and 'Volume Mode'
3
Wonderful site! I am considering the LG 55EG9100. The primary use for a while will be playing DVD's. Is this way too much TV for that purpose, and if so, a recommendation in a 55" set? Second question involves reflection in a curved TV. It will be in a room with large windows on the side wall, not on the wall facing the TV. How much more reflection from side walls is a curved screen going to have than a flat TV? Thanks!
If you care about picture quality, your DVDs will look better on the LG EG9100 than on any other LED TV so it is a good choice. You might pick up reflections from the side windows more on a curved screen though but the EG9100 is really good to fight reflections. They may appear larger but more faint. They also have a purple tint.
2
Thanks for a very thorough review. A few things jumped out at me:
1) It says the EG9100 has better contrast than the EC9300, yet it seems to have lower light output at every % white (quite significant at 100% in particular, a 20% decrease in brightness). Is this apparent in content (perhaps animated content in particular as it would activate ABL more)?
2) Comparing the two reflection images the EG9100 looks to diffuse the light substantially more than the EC9300, especially evident with the second light essentially disappearing. It almost seems like it's no longer glossy, is this just a difference in camera focus/conditions?
3) It seems that the color is substantially more accurate out of the box relative to the last generation (1.5 from 2.5 originally), but there was no mention of this. To me 1.5 dE seems very good, and indeed on the JU7100 despite having a dE of 2.7 you say "The colors pre calibration are quite good." whereas here with a 1.5 value it says "Pre calibration, even under 'Expert1' picture mode, the colors aren't good. They are over-saturated..."
4) Finally I was curious what difference, if any the EG9100 has over the EC9300 software-wise since I had previously heard the EG9100 had "new guts" and was a true web OS 2.0 TV, while the old model got a fresh coat of UI paint but wasn't as fast and had a worse remote.
I do not mean to be overly harsh of this review, understand my comments are out of confusion only. You do truly amazing work. Thank you.
Thanks for the feedback. Keep them coming.
1) Contrast is the same on both, because it is "infinite". As far as luminosity, the difference isn't really noticeable under real life scenarios. If you really look for it or they are side by side, yes the EG9100 has more ABL than the EC9300.
2) The lamp was slightly closer to the wall. We retook the picture and it should be good now (refresh your browser). Thanks for pointing this error! The screen finish is really the same. Next year we will have a more fixed setup to prevent this issue from happening again.
3) That's a good point. The colors were indeed over saturated, but the corners of the triangle (the ones that we measure officially) were good. It's the less saturated colors (inside the triangle) that were too saturated. This doesn't show in our results here, but we noticed it during the calibration and fixed this issue by reducing the 'Color' setting. We will probably need to update our color test next year to include more data points. Keep in mind thought that calibration/colors OLED TVs really depend on where on the screen you measure. In our gray uniformity test, you can see that some part of the screen on our EG9100 was more pink.
4) Yes that's true. The software feels slower on the EC9300 and the remote isn't as useful (less buttons).
2
Should there be any concern with image burn-in? Specifically, how some channels have their logo fixed in the corner of the picture for long periods of time? I believe I read somewhere that Samsung OLED TVs have an anti-burn-in feature. Does this have something similar?
There's no anti-burn-in feature. While it is possible that there could be permanent burn-in, we don't expect that will happen, and so don't think it's anything to worry about.
2
First of all, thank you for the excellent reviews and responses! I'm considering this or 55EC9300 as my next tv (mainly to show content and play games from my desktop pc and streaming from Prime and Netflix), and both seem pretty similar spec-vice. However, I read from some discussion that this tv should have capability of downscaling 4k content, is this true? Can it downscale 4k Chroma 4:4:4 content to 1080p or is this model identical to 9300 (also) in this sense? Also, which HDMI version is it using?
The EG9100 will be able to display a 3840x2160 resolution @ 60Hz but the result isn't pretty. For example, icon names on a desktop PC are unreadable. 4:4:4 doesn't matter in that mode since you lose so much details that it won't make a difference. There is no HDMI 2.0 on this TV.
2
Would this television play 1080p HDR content if available? When should wide color gamut be enabled?
There won't be 1080p HDR content, but it's likely that you could connect a UHD Blu-ray player to the TV, and the player would downscale the video to 1080p, allowing it to be played on the TV. In that case, it would be worth enabling. For other content, though, enabling the WCG would just make the colors look over-saturated.
2
Family will have the TV on a lot during the day (8 - 12 hours). They often binge-watch SD shows like 4:3 old TV shows. I'm concerned about what this might do to the TV. Is this the wrong TV based on that?
No, it's a fine choice. You'll have temporary retention of the bars when you switch from 4:3 to 16:9 content, but that should go away after a few minutes. There shouldn't be any permanent burn-in.
1
Last year I purchased a Vizio M322i and discovered that the closed captioning feature on the TV doesn't work on any of the HDMI inputs. So any satellite, cable, DVD, etc that is connected through HDMI doesn't have captions. I am wondering if this is set up the same way, or if there is an easy way to check the CC feature in a review.
HDMI does not transmit CC information, so the responsibility for handling the captions lies with the source device. You'll need to go into the satellite/cable box menu for the captioning options, and for DVDs, you can usually find those options on the disc menu.
1
Your reviews are great! I just got this tv and i use it with an Intel nuc i5 with kodi. My question is, should i set my input to pc so that i can take advantage of the chroma 4:4:4? I have done that and noticed i lose quite a bit of options in the menus but the picture looks great still. Worth it or change it back to plain old HDMI?
Chroma 4:4:4 isn't useful for an HTPC so you can disable it to get back your other TV options.
1
I've been gaming on an old 46" 2007 Samsung LCD (LN-T4665F) all these years and I find its input lag in Game Mode to be very manageable. While the 43.5ms input lag of the EG9100 isn't optimal, do you suppose that it is better (or at least on par) with my old Samsung in that regard? I'm leaning towards getting this set over a JS7500, but only if it's at least as playable for fps games as my current relic.
There is no way to say for sure if the input lag will be better without taking the measurement on your current TV but generally speaking, input lags are lower now then what they used to be on older LCD TVs. We actually tried an FPS game on the EG9100 and it was responsive enough not to be a problem.
1
Are there potential issues with image retention for watching sports or video games? Is some kind of conditioning advised for this TV?
There's a possibility of image retention, but it's extremely unlikely that it would be permanent, and it should generally go away after a few minutes of regular viewing. Keeping the 'OLED Light' setting lower should help a bit, but there's no need to worry. Just enjoy your TV.
1
Is LG's OLED technology reliable? How is LG's warranty and service for OLED technology? The only thing holding me back right now is not knowing how long the TV will hold up. Ive heard OLED has a shorter life span than LED.
They have the same 1 year warranty for labor and parts, so apart from being a new technology, the support/service is the same. OLED degrades faster than LED, but the sets are expected to last at the very least 5 years, and more likely between 8 and 9 years. So LED will likely last longer, but both technologies will likely last longer than most people keep their TV anyway.
1
Is there a known issue with this TV and PS4? I can't for the life of me get the PS4 to output 5.1 when connected through HDMI to the TV. My Apple TV switches over to 5.1 properly when playing Netflix or Plex.
Enable 'SIMPLINK.' That should correct the issue.
You should also make sure your PS4 is set to output a Dolby Digital or DTS 5.1 audio signal, just in case one of those is disabled.
1
Hello. I just purchased the LG OLED 55EG9100. Can I record TV programs on this? My magic remote doesn't seem to have Time Machine II.
It isn't an option on our TV. There are claims online that it may be possible if you change your country to 'Spain' (not an option on our TV), so if that is possible for you, it might be worth a try. Otherwise, the answer will be no.
1
Thanks for the wonderful review! I can confirm that this helped me buy this TV. I am convinced that this is the best TV available for the price and since 4K is long way to go, I believe I did the right choice to buy LG EG9100. The only issue I have is with the text. Since I am using the TV for my computer desktop monitor, the text appears not sharp enough and clear. I have tried many settings to work it out but i am still not satisfied :( 1) I have the TV labelled as PC in the TV input settings. This definitely helped but did not fixed the blurry text. 2) I have tried increasing the sharpness but still did not work. 3) I wonder if this could be HDMI cable issue? But it was perfectly fine on my old 47 LG. Can you suggest anything to work this issue out? P.S. The picture quality is amazing! Deep black and vivid colors. Thanks in advance! Best wishes K.
Make sure you have changed the icon of the HDMI input and not just the label. Beside that, you have all the good settings to get clear text. Increasing sharpness might help but too much and it can make it worse. Any 'high speed' HDMI cable should work. Trying a different one is a good idea but it would be surprising your current cable can't do the job. Up-close the EG9100 has some kind of screen door effect because its pixels are small and the black spaces between them can be perceived. It can add to the impression of the lack of sharpness with some fonts. Also about fonts in Windows, they aren't always the more precise since some have shadows. If you want to make sure chroma 4:4:4 is working like it should, download this file and open it with paint, the 2 bottom rows should appear very sharp with chroma 4:4:4 and blurry without it (outside PC mode). If the letters are sharp and the pixels well defined up-close, then you can't get any better/clearer than that.
1
There are so many TV's. I am close to getting the LG55EG9100 1080p curved smart OLED because of this site. Should I worry that it doesn't have Ultra High Definition? I am a tennis coach and have a lot of that on tv. Plus I watch a lot of old movies. Thanks.
The UHD TVs are only worth it if you plan on watching 4k contents in the future. With what you are watching now, no need for 4k. The LG EG9100 will be excellent for watching tennis and anything else. OLED TVs are considered the best right now.
1
I am thinking of buying the LG 55EG9100. Is it risky buying online? It's so much cheaper (almost $500) than Best Buy, Amazon, and many other reputed stores. These are stores that I haven''t heard of, mostly in New Jersey, with no shipping and handling and no taxes. Do you have any suggestions for me??
There's nothing wrong with buying online, though some online stores can be a little shifty. You also shouldn't be finding any deep discounts at one store that you're not seeing at the others, since it's nearly always the manufacturer that sets the price of TVs.
Take a look at this page to see a list of LG's authorized dealers. If the store in question appears, it's a safe buy. If not, you should probably consider looking elsewhere.
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Good day and thank you for taking the time to answer this question. I am currently on my fourth TV in a month. I had and returned two Sony 65X850C's. Both had major issues resolving how to handle blacks when part of the screen was white and most was dark. I have been told that this was me being overly demanding, but once I noticed, I couldn't un-notice. At the end of the day, and substantially more research, I moved into the LG EG9100. While we would have liked a bigger TV, we decided picture quality was more important than size. Also, from where we sit in the room, we were literally right on the fringe of being able to discern 4K or not (at 65", so a 55" put us squarely in the "4K doesn't make any difference to your eyes" range). I couldn't have been happier with the result. In fact, I kept saying to my fiancee, "look how amazing that looks!" to the point of being annoying (and probably irritation because she was still mad we didn't have a huge TV to justify what we paid). I was most impressed with how end credits appeared. Now, I know through hours of research that end credits are almost an unfair test on a TV because reconciling those opposite colors is difficult, but because each pixel on this TV is independently illuminated, I anticipated it wouldn't be that great of a challenge. And it wasn't. The 9100 handled the credits like a champ. All was well until, two hours into the first day of viewing I noticed a glaring red pixel on the black screen of the Netflix welcome screen. I turned the set off, back on and it was gone. It was gone because it had burned itself out. The next day I tested all four colors on the screen and the whites, greens and blues were all perfect but a solid red screen had a void where the red pixel had shone so brightly the day before. Curious if this was common, I researched and read that it was on older OLED's when the tech was relatively new. After speaking with three BB's in the area and learning that no one had ever returned an OLED by LG to any of them, for any reason, I decided to exchange it. My hesitation was that the next set would have three, or six, or twenty dead pixels, but I was reassured when I arrived and the return was the talk of the place. Everyone was baffled, and they were happy to do the exchange. Which brings me to my current issue, and I do apologize for the long lead-in. Out of the box, the replacement had a far poorer picture than the first one. Every review I read warned that this TV did not look good "out of the box," so I did not let it bother me. There were and are zero dead or stuck pixels, and I have calibrated it to your settings (but I stopped where you recommend stopping in your calibration recommendations and did not get into the ultra-fine tuning that a professional calibration would delve into). With your tweaks, I was able to get it to look better, but I swear that the first one still looked better. My questions are: did I get used to the much improved screen of LG #1 over the Sony and am now being overly-critical of LG #2 because the difference isn't as drastic as it was moving between brands and technology? Is it possible that I just got really lucky with the first one and it happened to look perfect for my room? Should I pay the money for a professional calibration? Is there any truth to a review I read where a guy swore the 9100's with "September 2015" manufacturing dates were cursed (didn't check the first one, the current one falls within this category)? And finally, what brought me to bother you with this message - I was watching the end credits of "The Judge" yesterday and got pretty bummed out. Each time a name appeared on the screen (when they were flashing individual names on the screen, not when the whole list appeared) large portions of the screen, most notably near the bottom and radiating up, would lighten to a dark grey. Where the screen was supposed to be black, it wasn't. Every name would illuminate as it should, but other parts of the screen would lighten as well. Additionally, a faint vertical grey line appeared to the left of each credit and disappeared when the credit vanished. This type of activity would not surprise me if I was viewing an LCD television. It looked surprising like light bleed from a bottom-edge-lit TV. But because the OLED has only light from each pixel, why would I see the screen lighten where there was no activity within the film? I would have bet major money the first LG did not do this, but cannot be certain because we didn't view any end credits while it was in the house. Do I have yet another unsatisfactory set? Am I being far too picky? Do I simply need a calibration? What caused the vertical line and the appearance of light bleed? Is this the infamous "color banding" these are known for? Please help me understand, and thank you for entertaining this long-winded message! I really hate to box up yet another TV. I'd have to take it to a different store this time because those guys (as truly great as they have been) have got to be sick of seeing me. Kris
We understand the feeling. The variance between units shouldn't cause big differences like the ones you mentioned. If you are using all of our settings, then chances are that the source quality of the movie you watched with the new OLED is to be blamed. To be able to compare the new TV with the old one then you need to watch the same content with the same settings. On an OLED TV, end credits should offer bright white names on a deep black background. Try a few movies. One can always look bad but most should look very good. What you refer to banding might actually be it if it were on a dark gray background instead of pure black (the banding problem on OLED is more apparent on shades of gray, not totally black screen). You certainly don't need a professional calibrator to fix this. If most of the content you watch have these problems though, then yes, unfortunately, you should exchange the TV for a different one. You wouldn't be the first with this kind of bad luck. You might also want to play with the 'Cell Light' setting, as well as the 'Gamma' setting to see if it fixes your issue.
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I have this television coming this week and I'm already a worrywart.
Motion blur may be great, but the EG9100 I saw at Cosco had a bad case of the "jaggies" with patterns. The two Vizio sets on either side didn't exhibit this issue. And now I just read a recent review on Amazon from a guy who seems somewhat familiar with televisions and he pointed out the same thing. Please tell me it's probably because of how the motion was set. If not, then this television doesn't hold a candle compared to a plasma like the F8500 when it comes to motion resolution.
It depends what you mean by jaggies. If you are refering to jagged lines, this is probably the screen door effect (from close, it may look like you're watching the TV through a screen door), because OLED TVs have more space between pixels. Combined that with the EG9100's 1080p resolution and it does make sense that you might see jaggies a bit more than on the Vizio LED TVs (especially if those TVs were UHD). But if you are referring to shuttered movement, that's mainly because the response time (motion blur) is perfect on OLED TVs, where as on LED TVs, all frames blend together.
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Would you buy the sony X850d over the EG9100? Yes the oled has fantastic contrast and pure black, but for watching movie/tv shows/sports where the picture isn't really pure black am I better buying the Sony? I've always been a Sony fan and think they make excellent tv's with natural picture quality. However I'm torn between spending the same amount of money on a non-4k tv. Surely having 4k on the Sony would mean a better picture quality when watching HD due to the upscaling? Please help, am I being too brand loyal? Or do Sony still have what it takes to go head to head with the oleds?
The two biggest advantages of OLED are the viewing angle and the pure blacks. If you don't care about these, then the Sony X850D is a better choice especially if you want 4k. Upscaling won't improve the picture quality though.
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Why does the lg oled 9100 does not give me 5.1 surround through hdmi hook up?
5.1 passthrough worked on ours, both via HDMI ARC and optical. Maybe your source is not configured properly?
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As always thanks for the great reviews. I have a couple suggestions. 1) Audio passthrough - list what the TV will send through optical and ARC. The manufacturers are not very forthcoming with this information. 2) It seems unfair to give 1080p TVs a lower Resolution score for not being able to display 4k. I realize the individual scores can be looked at but is misleading to use the 18% weight for a score of zero for 4k. The TV isn't designed for 4k and no one expects it to display 4k.
Thank you for the suggestions. At the moment we test audio pass-through for specific TVs when we are being asked about it. In a few weeks, we will take the time to do the test on all the 2015 TVs that we reviewed and we will write down the results in the main reviews. For 1080p TVs getting a lower 'Resolution' score because they can't (obviously) do 4k, it is mainly so that all TVs can be compared together. In that mindset, a 4k TV has a plus value compared to a 1080p TV and will obviously produce a better picture on a higher resolution. At the same time, if our visitors only compare 1080p TVs, then they all have the same fair score basis. We do the same for other parts of our scoring system like for 'Local Dimming' where there is a possibility of an added 14% on the 'Picture' score as well as '3D' that can also add another 5%. We don't do separate categories for 3D vs non-3D TVs. If you have suggestions to better our scoring system and that would still allow us to compare all the TVs together, we would be glad to hear it. We really encourage those kind of feedback. Thank you very much!
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I've heard that oleds have less image retention than even the last generation of plasma. I had the F8500 and it had tons of image retention. Are Oleds better than plasma on this issue? Cnet seemed to think so.
We have seen image retention on the OLED TVs we tested but nothing really bad. We would expect it to be about the same as plasma TVs.
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Thanks for this very comprehensive and helpful review of the 55EG9100. Currently I own one of the last and best plasma TVs,the Samsung F8500. Reviews of that model usually seem to give it high marks for motion handling, but I'm wondering if the LG OLED might be even better in this regard.
Is it possible to go into greater detail about the way we might perceive motion differently on a non-flickering OLED screen as opposed to a flickering plasma screen?
Also, I admit that I have never been quite sure what exactly I am seeing when I watch the "Local Dimming" video. I realize that with an emissive-pixel OLED display, "local dimming" is essentially perfect, though I do notice a slight amount of bloom around the moving dot. And I am also a little confused by seeing just a single dot when it is moving slowly, but 3-4 dots in a line when the test speeds up. Isn't this demonstrating that fast-moving objects will be perceived by the eye as a a smudge, or am I misinterpreting what this test signifies?
Any clarification you can give me on the issue of motion handling will be greatly appreciated! By the way, I'm not bothered by "Soap Opera Effect," so I am glad to engage smoothing/interpolation if it helps to lessen stuttering in a moving image. Thanks again for any advice you can offer. I may need to replace my plasma TV, since it is already starting to develop glitches.
There are two main differences between the two: plasma TVs flicker and have what is known as 'phosphor trails,' and OLED TVs don't flicker, and have virtually no trail on movement.
For the most part, we consider OLED TVs to have better movement purely because they don't have a trail on movement (which plasma TVs do), but people who really like flickering - which could be the case for plasma owners - may find the lack of flicker to be jarring. It could highlight the blur that OLED does have, which we go into detail about in this article.
As for the local dimming video, the appearance of multiple dots is just created by the camera. Playing the pattern on-location, you can only see one dot. The intention of the video is to show how a small, bright object moving about the screen will affect the rest of the screen. With LED TVs using local dimming (which essentially tries to mimic an OLED set's natural abilities), a large amount of blooming will be present surrounding the moving dot. OLED TVs do not have this problem, so we film the same local dimming pattern so that people can directly compare LED TVs + local dimming with OLED TVs.
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Will the LG EG9100 work with an infrared remote control? Will my Harmony 600 work on this TV? Thanks!
Yes, it will.
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Just purchased the LG EG9100. I was wondering if I will lose the built in channel guide feature and remote use with Verizon Fios? I've been stuck using the set top box and remote with my Panasonic and Vizio before.
'Verizon Fios' is available in the TV 'Universal control' setup menu so it would be expected to be working fine.
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I'm looking to buy a TV as a client monitor in my video editing suite, which has an video I/O card that outputs uncompressed 4:4:4 10-bit video that I would connect the TV to. Is the EG9100 a 10-bit panel? Or is it 8-bit?
Unfortunately we didn't test if it was a 8 bit or 10 bit panel in 2015.
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I'm having a hell of an issue, and unfortunately I'm not able to test a theory at the moment: so I come to you guys in the hope that you'll have the answer I've been searching for over 6 months for. My issue is with Color Gradients: specifically with color banding. My EG9100 is a great tv. The Blacks are perfect and contrast is fantastic, but color gradients are HORRID. ABSOLUTELY TERRIBLE. The article you have here seems to sum up my issue perfectly (especially the first images), but I've been in contact with LG lots of times and they say it is a 10bit color depth TV. So, I'm left wondering why my color gradients are so terrible. I've tried: different hdmi cables from different companies, different devices plugged into the tv at different hdmi inputs, modifying windows color profile settings, modifying my graphics card settings (every single setting possible in the nvidia options), modifying the settings on the tv itself (every available option)... pretty much everything I can think of to try and none of it improves the color banding issue. I've finally broken down and called for help from LG and I'm having a service center try and replace the panel or board on it to see if that's the issue. My one theory on it would be that the tv is bad, so I would need another one to test, but I don't have access to another one and don't have the money to get it. I'm worried that replacing the panel and board won't fix the issue...and that would mean the tv just fucking sucks and I'm stuck with it. Anyone, everyone—please en-fucking-lighten me on what to do.
Almost all TVs have banding in color gradients. Our EG9100 wasn't particularly terrible for it. Make sure you reset the 2pts, 20pts and color space calibration, as these can often introduce problems in gradients. If it doesn't improve it, you could exchange your TV if it is really bad.
Just to be clear though, the 8 bit gradients steps are normal. You need to send in a real 10 bit gradient to see if it improves, and this can't be done using one of the built-in photo viewers of Windows. You need Photoshop with 30 bit enabled to do so, as well as a graphic card that supports 10 bit (like the Nvidia Quadro series).
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Hi. I recently picked up this set as the deal of the day on Amazon a few weeks back for 1099. I'm impressed with the picture quality and it definitely outperforms my entry level 4k Samsung in the living but now I'm wondering if 1080p is enough. lol Would you advise that the increase in picture quality, 4k, and HDR content make returning this TV (and losing the great deal that I got) and shelling out some extra cash to purchase a B6P or C6P worth it? My main uses for the TV would be dark room watching from around 7 feet. Mostly movies, streaming Netflix, and watching sports. Thanks! Also, I might add if I find the right price I could possibly upgrade to the 65" C6P or B6P. At the 7 foot viewing distance would u recommend the curved screen of the C6P or would it not be much different from the flat B6P?
At 7', you are at the sweet spot for a 55" 1080p TV and a 4k TV would be a better choice only if you would be sitting closer to the set. For HDR, there is some positive to wait a bit before buying an HDR TV. HDR as it is today, is still not perfect and the HDR TVs too are not perfect. So if you are happy with the LG EG9100 that you got at a very good price and that you can wait a bit for HDR, maybe you would be better to keep it.

That said, if you find a good deal on a 65" 4k OLED and you can afford it, why not. For the curve, this is really a personal preference, but in general we think that it is not really worth it.

We are not taking any more questions for this product because we no longer have it in our lab.